Your Brain on Love (and Four Other Things, Too)

Your Brain on Love (and Four Other Things, Too)

The brain is an extremely complex organ. Researchers are still struggling to uncover all of its potential functions, but have discovered numerous ways in which it can be influenced. A change in the concentration of neurotransmitters, for example, can abruptly affect your mood and behavior. If altered significantly, hormone levels can cause you to fall in love just as quickly as they can send you into depression. Interestingly enough, these hormones and neurotransmitters can be at the mercy of factors outside of the human body. Listening to music, playing video games, or seeing your crush can all set the gears in motion, causing a rush of chemicals that are allowed to engage with the brain in different ways.

02:54

from ASAPScience

Key Facts In This Video

  • 1

    Love is intertwined with the evolutionary survival of the human race. (0:19)

  • 2

    The brain of someone in love looks similar to the brain of someone on cocaine. (0:44)

  • 3

    There is a surge of dopamine and norepinephrine during orgasm and when we look at pictures of those we love. (1:21)

02:47

Key Facts In This Video

  • 1

    Cursive plays an important role in developing kids' cognitive skills. (0:38)

  • 2

    Writing in print is better for the brain than typing. (1:41)

04:41

Key Facts In This Video

  • 1

    People decide their initial physical attraction to someone in as little as 200 milliseconds. (0:23)

  • 2

    As you get to know someone and fall in love, the concoction of hormones in your brain changes and elicits different feelings and responses. (2:23)

  • 3

    The scientific term for a break up is "frustration attraction." (3:11)

03:41
04:04

from BrainCraft

Key Facts In This Video

  • 1

    Playing Tetris may reduce flashbacks for people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). (1:05)

  • 2

    Tetris is addictive because it appeals to our natural desire to organize things, complete tasks and achieve goals. (1:43)

  • 3

    The pace of Tetris forces players to think with the game instead of about it, which is called Epistemic Action. (2:22)

01:25

from Piled Higher and Deeper (PHD Comics)

See all

Brain

Love

Cancer

Fringe Theory

Get smarter every day! Like us on Facebook.
You'll get the most interesting and engaging topics in your feed, straight from our team of experts.