Climate

Watermelon Snow Is A Glacier's Enemy

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Watermelon snow sounds like it would be harmless -- and maybe even cute. In reality, it's the opposite. Watermelon snow, also known as snow algae, pink snow, red snow, and blood snow, is a species of algae called Chlamydomonas nivalis. This algae is accelerating the rate at which glaciers in the Arctic are melting. It is sweet-smelling, pink-tinted, and thrives in snow. But the most dangerous part about watermelon snow is that is decreases the reflectivity (known as albedo) of snow. Without a high albedo, snow reflects less sunlight, thus absorbing more heat and melting faster. We've collected some awesome videos on this topic. Watch them now to learn more.

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