The First Woman To Run For President Couldn't Even Vote

The First Woman To Run For President Couldn't Even Vote

Victoria Woodhull could be described as a radical -- she was the first woman to run for President of the United States, after all. But that's not even the most interesting part of her story. Woodhull ran for office in 1872, almost 50 years before the 1920 ratification of the 19th Amendment gave women the right to vote. Woodhull's father was a snake oil salesman, and she herself was a medical clairvoyant. She also began the first female-run stock brokerage on Wall Street and the first female-run newspaper. When it came to her presidential campaign, Woodhull was less than successful. Even if she had been allowed to vote in the election, she wouldn't have been able to: Woodhull was in jail on election night. She wrote an article exposing the affair of a well-known preacher, and was arrested on a count of obscenity.

The First Woman to Run for President - Herstory 9

04:46

from Stuff Mom Never Told You - HowStuffWorks

Key Facts In This Video

  • 1

    Victoria Woodhull was the first woman to run for president, and she did so in 1872, almost 50 years before women got the right to vote. (0:17)

  • 2

    Abolitionist Frederick Douglass was named as the running mate of the first woman to run for President of the U.S. (2:26)

See all

Pioneering Women

United States

Drinking

Government

Get smarter every day! Like us on Facebook.
You'll get the most interesting and engaging topics in your feed, straight from our team of experts.