Science Of...

Men and Women See The World Differently

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It's easy to say that men and women don't see eye to eye on certain things — but it turns out that when it comes to vision, that truly is the case. For example, one study showed that women could differentiate between similar hues that looked identical to men, particularly those in the yellow and green range. Men, however, were more adept at pinpointing when light or dark barks flickered on a screen. Scientists aren't sure why these differences exist, though some believe that the increased amount of testosterone in the visual regions of men's brains may be the cause. Others think that the difference could be cultural, not hardwired. Learn more about color, and how we see it, below.

10 Amazing Facts About Color

Blue is the world's favorite color.

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Key Facts In This Video

  1. Multiple surveys have shown that blue is the most popular response to "What is your favorite color?". 00:29

  2. Bulls aren't actually angered by the color red. 01:08

  3. School buses are yellow because it is the most attention-grabbing color when seen in our peripheral vision. 01:55

How Many Colors Can We See?

Spoiler alert: It depends.

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Key Facts In This Video

  1. Cones are the eye's color receptors, and most people have three types: blue, red, and green. 00:23

  2. Most humans can see about 1 million colors. 00:55

  3. Tetrachromats have a fourth type of cone, and can see up to 100 million colors. 01:52

The Science Of Color Blindness

Why does it only affect males?

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Key Facts In This Video

  1. The cones in the retina contain three types of photopigments that are sensitive to different wavelengths of visible light. 00:16

  2. The genes for red and green photopigments are located on the X chromosome, which is why more males are colorblind than females. 01:23

  3. Colorblindness doesn't mean that you see the world in shades of gray. 01:48

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