Last Time Earth Was At This Spot in the Galaxy, Dinosaurs Existed

Last Time Earth Was At This Spot in the Galaxy, Dinosaurs Existed

You're always moving because the earth is always rotating. It's also revolving around the sun, making a complete orbit once a year. Our sun, likewise, revolves around the Milky Way galaxy, taking our entire solar system with it. It takes the sun approximately 225-250 million years to make a full trip around the galaxy, a period known as a "cosmic year." This means that at any given moment, our planet is in roughly the same spot in the Milky Way it was 250 million years ago. Today, that point in history coincides with the Permian-Triassic extinction, the most catastrophic of our planet's five mass extinction events, when 90% of marine species and 70% of land species died out. After the extensive decimation, the Triassic period began, bringing with it Archosaurs, early grasshoppers, and eventually the first mammals, all of which lived on the supercontinent known as Pangaea. In another 250 million years, we'll arrive back at this spot in the Milky Way. Find out more about the movement of the universe in these videos.

How Fast Are You Moving Through The Universe?

It's difficult to answer, because there are so many moving parts.

05:08

Key Facts In This Video

  • 1

    As the Earth rotates, the Equator moves the fastest while the poles move the slowest. (1:06)

  • 2

    The Milky Way Galaxy is headed toward the Andromeda Galaxy at approximately 405,500 kph (252,000 mph). (2:40)

  • 3

    Here's a breakdown of humanity's celestial speed: (3:58)

How Fast Is The Universe Expanding?

Fraser Cain, publisher of Universe Today, breaks it down.

03:21

The Fastest Runaway Star In The Galaxy

How is it that some stars don't orbit the center of the galaxy? Here are some scientific theories.

04:45

Key Facts In This Video

  • 1

    The star US 708 is moving at 745 miles per second (1,200 km/sec) toward intergalactic space. (0:25)

  • 2

    US 708 may have originally been a red giant in a binary system with a white dwarf. (2:50)

  • 3

    Astronomers analyze Type 1A supernovae to calculate how far away other galaxies are, and how fast they're moving. (3:49)

See all

Dinosaurs

Earth

Galaxies

Planets

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