Chemistry

How Big Of A Number Is One Mole?

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Just like you can have one dozen eggs (12) or one ream of paper (500), a mole is a number used to measure things. The number associated with one mole is 6.02x10^23-which is a mind-blowingly large number. Specifically, moles are used in chemistry, and this is because moles reference huge quantities of tiny molecules and atoms. For example, in just a half-liter water bottle, you will find just over 25 moles of water molecules.

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Key Facts In This Video

  1. A mole is a specific number, 6.02 X 10^23, and is usually used to represent atoms or molecules. 00:31

  2. The mole is a convenient way to quantify huge numbers. 02:17

  3. Having the same number of atoms in one mole doesn't mean that they are the same size or weight. 02:49

Written by Curiosity Staff October 16, 2015

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