Here's Why We Tell People To "Put A Sock In It"

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The expression "put a sock in it" is a way of telling someone today to be quiet. Back when gramophones were the main medium for playing music at home, the phrase meant to lower its volume. Gramophones did not have volume control knobs, so the owners would literally stuff socks into the amplification horn to decrease the volume.

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Key Facts In This Video

  1. "A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush" means that it's better to have a small but real advantage than a slight possibility of a greater one. 00:18

  2. In medieval Europe, unwanted guests were served cold beef shoulder until they left—hence the expression "giving the cold shoulder." 01:24

  3. Gramophones did not have volume control knobs, so putting a sock in the opening was the only way to mute them. 02:23

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