Military Dolphins Defend The World's Largest Stockpile Of Nukes

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Military Dolphins Defend The World's Largest Stockpile Of Nukes

Add these animals to the "truth is stranger than fiction" list: military dolphins. The largest stockpile of nuclear weapons in the United States, and possibly even in the world, is defended by a group of militarized dolphins. Since 2010, the U.S. Navy has employed the animals to protect the Naval Base Kitsap, which is located on the Kitsap Peninsula in Washington about 20 miles outside Seattle. Prior to 2010, unwanted swimmers around this base were identified by trained sea lions. Though military dolphins are used for finding mines in other parts of the world, the Kitsap dolphins are on the lookout for intruders. Once a dolphin finds an unwanted swimmer, the dolphin swims back to its trainers, who might give it a transponder to mark the swimmer's location. Or, they may equip the dolphins with a shackle that will attach to the intruder and send a float to the surface as a signal to Naval officers. To hear more about the impressive Navy dolphin squad, check out the video below.

Do You Know Which Common Pets Are Illegal In Your State?

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Do You Know Which Common Pets Are Illegal In Your State?

If you live in Hawaii, you may not realize that your pet options are much slimmer than the rest of the country's. It's illegal to own gerbils, hamsters, snakes, geckos, ferrets and hermit crabs in The Aloha State. Some of these animals, like hamsters, gerbils, and ferrets, are illegal to own in California, too. Though these pets may seem harmless, the bans have more to do with the worry for a new invasive species population. If ferrets, for example, were to procreate in California or Hawaii, there would be no natural predator to help control their population, since ferrets are not native to that land. The decision to ban or restrict certain animals is left up to state legislature. We've collected some awesome videos on this topic. Watch them now to learn more.

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from DNews

Key Facts to Know

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    Ferrets are regulated or banned in many U.S. states. 0:47

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    The African pygmy hedgehog is illegal to posses in California, Georgia, Pennsylvania, and Hawaii, and restricted in Maine and Arizona. 1:34

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    A chimpanzee is about seven times stronger than an adult male. 2:23

Welcome To A Tiny Micronation In The Nevada Desert

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Welcome To A Tiny Micronation In The Nevada Desert

In 1977, then 15-year-old Kevin Baugh and his friend decided to start their own country. Because.... why not? The self-declared micronation (which is not formally recognized by the United States) came to be known as the Republic of Molossia, and thirty-nine years after its inception, Baugh is still the sitting president. Over the years, the micronation -- which sits on 6.3 acres in the desert of Dayton, Nevada -- has grown to a population of 32, with its own post office, bank, currency and time zone. Molossia isn't meant to be taken too seriously; its existence is arguably more of an exercise in free speech and creativity than politics. But the micronation is happy to accept tourists (as long as they make an appointment), and will provide a stamp for a visitor's passport. And while the micronation is small, its people did once receive a Christmas card from President Obama. Citizens here pay taxes to the U.S., but they call it "foreign aid."

The First Woman To Run For President Couldn't Even Vote

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The First Woman To Run For President Couldn't Even Vote

Victoria Woodhull could be described as a radical -- she was the first woman to run for President of the United States, after all. But that's not even the most interesting part of her story. Woodhull ran for office in 1872, almost 50 years before the 1920 ratification of the 19th Amendment gave women the right to vote. Woodhull's father was a snake oil salesman, and she herself was a medical clairvoyant. She also began the first female-run stock brokerage on Wall Street and the first female-run newspaper. When it came to her presidential campaign, Woodhull was less than successful. Even if she had been allowed to vote in the election, she wouldn't have been able to: Woodhull was in jail on election night. She wrote an article exposing the affair of a well-known preacher, and was arrested on a count of obscenity.

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Key Facts to Know

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    Victoria Woodhull was the first woman to run for president, and she did so in 1872, almost 50 years before women got the right to vote. 0:17

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    Abolitionist Frederick Douglass was named as the running mate of the first woman to run for President of the U.S. 2:26

Do People Really Believe In Outlandish Conspiracy Theories?

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Do People Really Believe In Outlandish Conspiracy Theories?

Ever wondered if lizard people are real? You're not alone. An incredible 12 million Americans not only believe lizard people exist, but they think these reptilians control politics. And this is just one of many surprisingly popular conspiracy theories. According to a 2013 poll conducted by Public Policy Polling, 51% of Americans believe there was a larger conspiracy behind JFK's assassination, making it the single most popular conspiracy theory. A surprising 14% believe in Bigfoot, and 7% believe the 1969 moon landing was staged. About 9% of Americans believe the government adds fluoride to our water, not for dental health reasons, but for something more sinister -- some believe they do it to control the minds of the public.

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Key Facts to Know

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    6% of Americans believe the moon landings were faked. 0:03

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    A popular conspiracy theory maintains that Elvis Presley is still alive. 3:03

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    The Grand Unified Conspiracy Theory claims that every conspiracy theory is connected. 6:50