Ultra-Diffuse Galaxies Are The Ghosts Of The Cosmos

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Ultra-Diffuse Galaxies Are The Ghosts Of The Cosmos

When talking about space, people often gravitate to the biggest, the brightest, and the closest to us. But sometimes it's just as fascinating to learn about the other end: the faint and seemingly insignificant. Ultra-diffuse galaxies are in the latter camp. These dim, wispy galaxies have caught the attention of astronomers, who have sought to find out how they formed.

A Food Theme Park Is Coming To Italy, And It'll Be Nearly The Size Of Disney World

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A Food Theme Park Is Coming To Italy, And It'll Be Nearly The Size Of Disney World

The creators of the popular worldwide Italian marketplace Eataly are opening FICO (Fabbrica Italiana Contadina, or Italian Farming Factory) Eataly World. According to Food & Wine magazine, this complex "will be a hub for production, education, and consumerism within one 80,000 square-meter theme park located in Bologna, Italy."

This Giant Martian Ice Deposit Could Be Really Handy On Future Missions

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This Giant Martian Ice Deposit Could Be Really Handy On Future Missions

In November 2016, NASA announced that they found a huge water ice deposit in the Utopia Planitia region of Mars. If you follow news about the Red Planet, you might think, "Big whoop. We've known there's water ice there for years." Not so fast: there's something special about this particular ice that could make future Mars missions much easier.

El Gordo Is The Biggest Galaxy Cluster Ever Seen In The Early Universe

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El Gordo Is The Biggest Galaxy Cluster Ever Seen In The Early Universe

The El Gordo galaxy cluster is big. How big is it? It's so big that it would take 3,000 Milky Way galaxies to equal its mass. It's so big that it weighs as much as 3 quadrillion suns. It's so big that a 2012 estimate said it was massive, and then a 2014 estimate said no, it's nearly twice that massive.

Photonic Propulsion Could Be Our Ticket To The Stars

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Photonic Propulsion Could Be Our Ticket To The Stars

Right now, the Voyager I spacecraft is hurtling through space at 35,000 miles per hour. That sounds fast, until you consider that it only recently left our solar system, 37 years after its 1977 launch. As impressive as our feats of spaceflight have been, there's an elephant in the room. Physics professor Philip Lubin laid it out clearly when he wrote, "While we all dream of human spaceflight to the stars in a way romanticized in books and movies, it is not within our power to do so." To get there, we're going to need to go much, much faster, and our current propulsion systems just aren't hacking it.