Getting Your Wisdom Teeth Removed Is Likely A Waste Of Time

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Getting Your Wisdom Teeth Removed Is Likely A Waste Of Time

Going under the knife to get your wisdom teeth taken out has become something of a rite of passage. It means you've reached the ripe old age of 17–25 (a young adult!), the time when this third set of molars starts coming in. Most of us in the U.S. and Australia have been there to offer advice and tips to our friends and family who are themselves about to get those stubborn chompers yanked out. Welp, turns out all that pain could've been avoided. There is mounting evidence that getting your wisdom teeth removed, in most cases, is totally unnecessary.

The Beautiful Black Teeth Of The B'laan People

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The Beautiful Black Teeth Of The B'laan People

In Mindanao, Philippines, the indigenous people have a custom quite opposite of modern Western beauty standards. The B'laan people of this region black their teeth because it is seen as the beauty ideal. This culture sees black teeth as more than just a sign of beauty, but also as a status symbol. People in the B'laan tribe with blackened teeth as viewed as more important. This tradition of blackening teeth was also very popular in ancient Japanese culture. The custom in the B'laan tribe has ancient roots as well, but the tradition is still practiced to this day. There are tribes in Vietnam that practice modern teeth blackening too.

Limpet Teeth Are The Strongest Natural Material

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Limpet Teeth Are The Strongest Natural Material

Although the teeth of the limpet are microscopic, they are the strongest natural material scientists have ever discovered. According to findings published in the Royal Society's Journal Interface, the secret to limpet teeth strength is the thinness of its condense mineral fibers. Scientists believe limpets need strong teeth in order to climb onto rocky surfaces as waves crash around them.

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Key Facts to Know

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    The teeth of the limpet may be the strongest natural material ever discovered. 0:04

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    The strength of limpet teeth is consistent no matter their size. 0:26

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    Limpet teeth beats spider silk as a stronger natural material. 0:52

Why Are Beaver Teeth Bright Orange?

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Why Are Beaver Teeth Bright Orange?

The incisors of beaver are fortified with iron and appear a bright orange. Not only does the iron give beavers the strength to cut through trees, it's also super effective in staving off cavities. The teeth also continuously grow and self-sharpen.

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from PBS

Key Facts to Know

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    Beavers are vegetarians. 0:07

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    One method beavers have for creating dams is to gnaw through a tree trunk and let the wind knock the tree over. 0:37

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    In the Rocky Mountains, beaver dams slowly filter billions of tons of water. 1:58

Prehistoric Humans Shaved With Shark Teeth

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Prehistoric Humans Shaved With Shark Teeth

Cave paintings have been found that depict prehistoric people shaving with shells, flint knives, and shark teeth. Later on, some cultures would shave with circular gold or copper razors, while others used sharpened blades of obsidian glass. The familiar, hoe-shaped razor wasn't invented until 1847.

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from Mike Cook

Key Facts to Know

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    Native Americans made arrowheads, knives, and other tools from obsidian. 0:29

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    Watch Mike Cook break blades of obsidian off from a large obsidian core: 1:51

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    Watch Mike Cook shave his face with an obsidian blade: 2:56