Leland Melvin Went From Football Star To Inspirational NASA Astronaut

1 of 33

Leland Melvin Went From Football Star To Inspirational NASA Astronaut

Leland Melvin took a uniquely adorable photo for his official NASA portrait—he snuck his two dogs into the studio with him. Though this image has made its rounds on the internet, Melvin has much more to offer than his heartwarming headshot. His story is a truly inspirational one.

Rick Barry Broke Free-Throw Records Shooting Underhand

2 of 33

Rick Barry Broke Free-Throw Records Shooting Underhand

Sometimes, the only way to beat the competition is to change the game entirely. In a way, that's what Rick Barry did. The 6'7" NBA player was a force to be reckoned with, scoring more than 25,000 points and earning a spot on 12 All-Star teams in his professional basketball career. But where he really stood out was at the free-throw line: he maintained a 90% free-throw accuracy throughout his career, which was the best in NBA history back in 1980. (He has since been surpassed by six NBA players, but even Steve Nash, who has the highest free-throw percentage in history, only shot a 90.43%.) During the 1978–79 season, Barry only missed nine free-throws. And he did it all by throwing granny-style.

The World Nomad Games Celebrate Traditional Nomadic Culture

3 of 33

The World Nomad Games Celebrate Traditional Nomadic Culture

Nomadic societies exist all over the globe, moving from place to place to find fresh pasture for their herds, ply a trade, or simply seek out new locales with the seasons. There are an estimated 30–40 million nomads in the world today, but that's nothing compared to what it once was. The modern way of life is threatening nomadic culture, and many are striving to preserve their heritage. That's the reason for the World Nomad Games, an event held in Kyrgyzstan.

The Average NFL Game Has Only 11 Minutes Of Action

4 of 33

The Average NFL Game Has Only 11 Minutes Of Action

Anyone who has ever tuned into an NFL broadcast knows that plenty of air time is spent showing players huddling, coaches yelling, and fans cheering. That's because while the on-field action can be exciting, it's usually short-lived. In fact, according to a 2010 Wall Street Journal study of four football broadcasts, the ball was only in play for an average of 10 minutes and 43 seconds — approximately 4 seconds per play — even though an NFL telecast lasts about 3 hours. "The Journal broke down every frame of the broadcasts for four games on four networks on one weekend in late December," according to the article that elaborated on the study. "Each shot in every broadcast was timed and logged in one of 22 categories." So what's happening for the rest of the broadcast? Commercials, for one. They demand about an hour of airtime. Replays take about 17 minutes, footage of cheerleaders command about 3 seconds, and shots of players standing around make up an average of 67 minutes, according to WSJ. So why are football broadcasts such a production if there's so little action? Find out in the videos below.

When Women Were Denied From The Olympics, A Women's-Only Version Emerged

5 of 33

When Women Were Denied From The Olympics, A Women's-Only Version Emerged

The modern Olympic Games haven't always been as welcoming and apolitical as they are today. In the early days of the games, women made up a very small percentage of the athletes, and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) only allowed women to compete in a few events. In the 1900 Olympics, only 22 women participated. After the 1912 Stockholm Games, IOC President Baron Pierre de Coubertin and his IOC colleagues expressed the belief that "an Olympiad with females would be impractical, uninteresting, unaesthetic and improper." The French athlete and activist Alice Milliat wasn't about to settle for that. Milliat founded the Fédération Sportive Féminine Internationale in 1921, and the group immediately decided to establish a women's Olympic Games as an alternative to the male-dominated competition. Four Women's World Games were held, the first in 1922 in Paris; then 1926 in Gothenburg, Sweden; then 1930 in Prague; and finally in 1934 in London. The participants came mostly from North America, Western Europe, and Japan. Hear the whole story in the video below.