Here's Why Fear Of Blood Makes You Faint When Other Phobias Make Your Heart Race

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Here's Why Fear Of Blood Makes You Faint When Other Phobias Make Your Heart Race

When people with blood injury injection (BII) phobia encounter their fears—which include seeing blood, anticipating an injury, or getting a shot—their heart rate and blood pressure drop, sometimes so much that they faint.

Why Early Birds Can't Be Trusted Late In The Day (Sort Of)

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Why Early Birds Can't Be Trusted Late In The Day (Sort Of)

You're more likely to lie when you're tired.

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from DNews

Key Facts to Know

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    Morality lives in the right hemisphere of the brain and scientists have found a way to influence our moral compass. 0:28

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    We are more prone to lie, cheat, and steal in the afternoon. 2:01

Learned Helplessness Makes You Give Up In The Face Of Adversity. Good News: It Can Be Fixed.

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Learned Helplessness Makes You Give Up In The Face Of Adversity. Good News: It Can Be Fixed.

The psychological phenomenon of learned helplessness is when you assume you have no control over a situation (even though you really do) and instead just give up.

Survivorship Bias Makes You Focus On Successes When You Should Remember Why Others Failed

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Survivorship Bias Makes You Focus On Successes When You Should Remember Why Others Failed

The cognitive quirk called survivorship bias causes you to focus on what winners do right instead of what losers do wrong, and it's probably affecting you more than you realize.

Think You're The Only One That Does Any Work Around Here? That's Overclaiming In Action.

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Think You're The Only One That Does Any Work Around Here? That's Overclaiming In Action.

Consider the following story, which may or may not be autobiographical: A college student named A is getting more and more frustrated with her roommate, named L. Every time A unloads the dishwasher, cleans the bathroom sink, or tidies up the coffee table, she thinks, "I can't believe how messy L is. She doesn't do anything around this place." Little by little, her resentment grows. But one day, out of the blue, L approaches A for a house meeting. L is distressed over the fact that she, L, is the only one who does housework. She has been sweeping the kitchen and cleaning the shower. The entire time A had been fuming over the fact she was doing more than her fair share, L was fuming over the exact same thing. Both college students were falling prey to the phenomenon of overclaiming: the tendency for people to believe they're doing more than their fair share of the work.