The No One Dies Alone Program Pairs Volunteers With Terminal Patients

1 of 20

The No One Dies Alone Program Pairs Volunteers With Terminal Patients

The fear of dying alone might plague humanity more than the fear of death itself. If you've ever had to visit a terminally ill loved one in the hospital, you've felt the importance of being with them in their final hours. But what about the patients who don't have anyone with whom to share their final moments? A nurse at Sacred Heart Medical Center in Eugene, Oregon, found the answer.In 1986, Sandra Clarke was working as a staff nurse at Sacred Heart when a frail, elderly man asked if she would stay with him. It was the end of Clarke's shift and she still had six more patients to check on, so she said she'd return later. When Clarke returned, the man had died, and he'd been alone when it happened. That's when Clarke vowed she would never have another patient die without someone by their side. Fifteen years later, the volunteer program No One Dies Alone (NODA) was born.

Having Been In Someone's Shoes Makes You Less Empathetic

2 of 20

Having Been In Someone's Shoes Makes You Less Empathetic

Imagine you're a college student who just went through a big breakup. You're so depressed that you're having trouble finishing an essay for a certain class, and you're hoping that you can plead your case and get the essay's deadline pushed back. You've heard through the grapevine that the teaching assistant recently went through a breakup, and you also know that the professor has been in a happy marriage for 30 years. Who do you choose to hear your request?You might think that the recently heartbroken TA would be your safest bet, since that person knows firsthand the struggles you're going through. You'd be wrong. According to Harvard researchers, having "been there" actually makes you less empathetic toward other people's struggles.

Jealousy Could Be Good For Your Relationship

3 of 20

Jealousy Could Be Good For Your Relationship

Jealousy is a normal, common, and often terribly uncomfortable human emotion. With the rise of social media, there are new opportunities to become jealous around every corner. But it turns out that jealousy may not be the relationship killer we think it is—admitting jealous feelings could even strengthen a romantic bond.Evolutionary psychologists think that jealousy is an evolutionary mechanism to help humans ward off "mate-poaching." A 2013 study in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships that had couples keep diaries of their and their partners' temptations, their feelings of commitment, and any "mate-guarding" behaviors taken, and found that people could tell pretty accurately when their partner was tempted. At the same time, however, the couples reported feeling more committed to the relationship when they had taken measures to guard their sweetie from temptation.

Our Brains Can't Handle Fake Faces

4 of 20

Our Brains Can't Handle Fake Faces

Horror films have primed us to fear a lot of usually pleasant things, from clowns to dolls. When did a child's play toy start giving us the creeps?As it turns out, doll faces have the ability to unsettle us at the most basic level. Humans are innately social creatures, so our brains have evolved to read faces for signs of emotion, intent, and potential threat. As dolls become increasingly realistic, our brains recognize their features as human-like...but not quite. The fact that their faces don't convey emotion just throws us off.

Some People Fear Public Speaking More Than Death Itself

5 of 20

Some People Fear Public Speaking More Than Death Itself

Whether it's a presentation at work, a speech for your brother's wedding, or the opening night of a big performance, most people have experienced "stage fright" to some degree. This fear is so serious that many people rank public speaking higher than death when surveyed about their greatest fears. How could one possibly fear public speaking more than death itself? Because, at the most basic level, humans are social animals.