Museo Atlantico, An Underwater Museum, Highlights Global Issues

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Museo Atlantico, An Underwater Museum, Highlights Global Issues

Sitting on the ocean floor in the Atlantic is something unexpected: Museo Atlantico, Europe's first underwater museum. British artist Jason deCaires Taylor created nearly 400 cement sculptures and dropped them into the museum's underwater space in February 2016. But the underwater aspect was not meant to be the most notable aspect of the museum; Museo Atlantico sends a powerful message.Taylor, who has created similar installations in Mexico and the Bahamas, aimed to spark controversy with Museo Atlantico. The underwater statues reference social issues that impact the worldwide community, including the growing concern over climate change. One of the statues depicts a raft of refugees fleeing to a new home. The museum is eco-friendly, too. All of the sculptures are also artificial reefs. As of February 2016, the museum is accessible for snorkelers and divers to view. Watch the video below to see the museum.

Audrey Munson Was The "It" Girl Of The Gilded Age

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Audrey Munson Was The "It" Girl Of The Gilded Age

Look up to the architecture around New York City and you'll see one thing in common: Audrey Munson. Munson was considered the "it" girl of the Gilded Age. She has also been described as America's Venus. Around the turn of the century, Munson was discovered on Fifth Avenue in New York because her Aphrodite-esque physique stood out as looking very Venus de Milo. After her discovery, she became the muse for scores of artists, and became a silent film star, known for appearing nude. Today, you can see Munson in the form of many of the public statues around New York City that used her as a muse.

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Key Facts to Know

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    Audrey Munson was called the "it" girl of the Gilded Age for being a muse for many artists during that time. 0:01

The Garden of Bomarzo Brings Monsters To Life Through Sculpture

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The Garden of Bomarzo Brings Monsters To Life Through Sculpture

The eerie Garden of Bomarzo in Italy was discovered by surrealist painter Salvador Dalí in 1938—it was a place the locals called the "Park of Monsters." The Park of Monsters was commissioned in 1552 by Italian Prince Pier Francesco Orsini. It is believed that Orsini commissioned the sculpture garden filled with horrifying monster sculptures after enduring a series of personally traumatizing events. Orsini saw his best friend die in battle, was held as a prisoner for three years, and then finally returned to his wife only to see her die shortly thereafter. It's believed he created the park as a way to deal with his immense grief.

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Key Facts to Know

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    Salvador Dalí discovered what the locals called the "Park of Monsters" in 1938. 0:22

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    Prince Pier Francesco Orsini commissioned the construction of the "Park of Monsters" in 1552 to chock visitors. 0:42

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    Salvador Dalí made a short film about the "Park of Monsters." 2:41

The Beautifully Precarious Art Of Rock Balancing

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The Beautifully Precarious Art Of Rock Balancing

There are a handful of famous rock balancers around the world who seem to be supernaturally in tune with their medium. One such artist, Michael Grab, says that he balances his stone sculptures by feeling for the tiniest of indentations on the rocks that can interact with and counterbalance each other. An annual Rock Stacking World Championship is held in Llano, Texas, where competitors can focus on categories such as height and arches.

Ancient Greek Statues Used To Be Colorful

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Ancient Greek Statues Used To Be Colorful

Although we know them as pristine, white marble statues, the breathtaking statues of ancient Greece were onced painted in bright colors and patterns. The original colors were identified using ultraviolet light. Infrared and X-ray spectroscopy helped researchers identify what materials were used to paint the sculptures.

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Key Facts to Know

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    The sculptures of ancient Greece were originally brightly painted. 0:01

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    Ultraviolet light reveals the original colors and patterns on ancient Greek statues. 0:50

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    Raking light reveals raised designs on ancient Greek statues. 2:32