The Radioactive Lake Karachay Is The World's Most Polluted Place

1 of 7

The Radioactive Lake Karachay Is The World's Most Polluted Place

A picturesque lake has been the inspiration of plenty of family vacations and weekend getaways. Just imagine it: nature, serenity, and peace. Oh, and radiation. Lots and lots of radiation. Enough radiation to kill you within a few hours of exposure. That's if you were ill-informed enough to plan a trip to Lake Karachay, anyway. This Russian lake is considered the most polluted place on the planet. And, no, it is definitely not a place you should have on your travel wish list.

09:29

from Vsauce

Key Facts to Know

  • 1

    93% of all humans who have ever lived are dead today. 0:03

  • 2

    You wouldn't just burn if you fell into molten lava, you would turn into an explosive mini eruption. 3:04

  • 3

    Lake Karachay in Russia was named the most polluted spot on Earth. 6:07

Russia's Womanhood Schools Teach Women To Be Housewives

2 of 7

Russia's Womanhood Schools Teach Women To Be Housewives

Welcome to a feminist's nightmare—womanhood school. These schools have gained popularity in Russia, and surprisingly aren't just old relics from a bygone era. Womanhood schools basically teach women to be housewives. Instructors at these schools generally believe that men are protectors and women are caretakers, and, according to a flyer for womanhood school Woman Inside, they want to help mold "the most incredible, successful, perfect young women who are what worthy men's dreams are made of."

A Russian Scientist Injected Himself With 3.5-Million-Year-Old Bacteria

3 of 7

A Russian Scientist Injected Himself With 3.5-Million-Year-Old Bacteria

People have been hunting down the legendary fountain of youth since antiquity. Does it exist? Could it ever, even theoretically, exist? A Russian scientist named Dr. Anatoli Brouchkov believes it's out there, and he thinks he found it in 3.5-million-year-old bacteria. So what does Dr. Brouchkov do next? Inject himself with it, of course. The bacteria, Bacillus F, was discovered in Siberia in 2009. The bacteria was at once impressive because, despite being roughly 3.5 million years old, it was alive in Siberian permafrost. Brouchkov believes there is a mechanism in this bacteria that allowed it to stay alive in the frost for millions of years. Hey, if bacteria can do it, so can we, right? Who knows, but Dr. Brouchkov was eager enough to experiment with that thought to inject himself with the stuff. Though it's hard to say if the bacteria "worked" to make the scientist immortal, Dr. Brouchkov claimed in 2015 that he's feeling better than ever. Only time will tell the rest of his story... Hear more about the unbelievable tale in the video below.

The Infamous Rudolf Abel Was The Most Successful Soviet Spy In History

4 of 7

The Infamous Rudolf Abel Was The Most Successful Soviet Spy In History

Rudolf Abel was a notorious spy during the Cold War, arguably the most successful Soviet spy of all time. But he wasn't born in the Soviet Union, nor was his real name Rudolf Abel. He was born Vilyam Fisher in 1903 in England. In 1921, Fisher and his family moved back to Russia. He joined the Soviet service for espionage in 1927, by which point he was a nuclear physicist. The KGB sent him to the U.S. in 1948 to serve as a spy, and, by the 1950s, Fisher was tasked with getting information on the U.S. nuclear program. During this time, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were convicted of and executed for conspiracy to commit espionage, so Fisher had to live extremely carefully, taking on hundreds of aliases -- including that of Rudolf Abel -- and staging elaborate scenarios to cover up his work. For example, Abel had to live a convincing life as a fine art photographer in New York City, all the while tapping into military intelligence and secretly sending his findings back to Russia. When he was eventually arrested in 1957, he was tried and convicted under the name Rudolf Abel. in 2015, his incredible life served as the inspiration for the Steven Spielberg film, "Bridge of Spies." We've collected some awesome videos on this topic to give you his whole amazing story. Watch them now to learn more.

07:02

Key Facts to Know

  • 1

    In 1927, the notorious Rudolf Abel and then-nuclear physicist joined in the service of Soviet espionage. 1:30

  • 2

    Famous Soviet spy Rudolf Abel managed to evade the FBI after his assistant betrayed him by giving information about his whereabouts. 4:06

What Do Lost Cosmonaut Theorists Believe?

5 of 7

What Do Lost Cosmonaut Theorists Believe?

On April 12, 1961, Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin became the first human in space. Or did he? Believers in the lost cosmonaut conspiracy theory think Gagarin was not the first person to reach space, but only the first person to survive the trip. These individuals believe the Soviet government launched several unsuccessful manned missions to space before Gagarin's flight on the Vostok 1. Rumors about the "lost cosmonauts" that attempted to survive a space mission date back to at least 1965. Two Italian brothers, Achilles and Giovanni Judica-Cordiglia, built a listening station in the 1950s, previous to Gagarin's mission. They claim to have picked up transmissions from space missions before and after Gagarin's that were less successful. In one recording, they say they heard an unnamed cosmonaut suffocating, and in other, heard a cosmonaut's voice as a malfunctioning craft was burning up.

05:02

Key Facts to Know

  • 1

    On April 12, 1961, Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin became the first human in space. 0:25

  • 2

    Rumors of "lost cosmonauts" that flew to space before Yuri Gagarin have been around since at least 1965. 1:27

  • 3

    The Soviet Union did, in fact, erase members of the Soviet space program from photographs. 3:06