Stephen Hawking Thinks Our History Is That "Of Stupidity"

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Stephen Hawking Thinks Our History Is That "Of Stupidity"

Studying the past is really only helpful if you can use it to benefit the future. If you can't learn from the mistakes of yesterday, the same mistakes get repeated. Even so, there's more to life than studying where humanity went wrong. Stephen Hawking made this point when he said, "We spend a great deal of time studying history, which, let's face it, is mostly the history of stupidity. So it's a welcome change that people are studying instead the future of intelligence." Hawking made this comment in an October 2016 lecture at the opening of the Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence (LCFI) at Cambridge University. The center is a multi-disciplinary institute that will look to address the unanswered questions around artificial intelligence.

P-Hacking Enables Scientists To Publish False Results As True

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P-Hacking Enables Scientists To Publish False Results As True

P-hacking: just the word sounds nefarious. But to understand just how nefarious it is, you first need to understand a statistical concept known as the p-value. Consider a simple scientific experiment, one to determine whether a certain drug helps lower blood pressure. All of the study participants take pills, but one group gets pills containing the drug and the other gets sugar pills—the placebo, or control group. Scientists record the results of the two groups, then put them through statistical analysis and come up with a p-value. This number, which is always between 0 and 1, helps the scientists determine whether any differences they see between the experimental and control groups are due to a real effect or random chance. The lower the number, the less likely it is that the result could have arisen in any way except for the drug actually working; the higher the number, the more likely it is that the drug isn't having a measurable effect on blood pressure. A low enough number—less than 0.05 or 0.01, depending on the field of study—is considered "statistically significant," and will give that study a better chance of being published.

Scientists May Have Made A Breakthrough In Fertility Treatment With IVM

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Scientists May Have Made A Breakthrough In Fertility Treatment With IVM

In vitro fertilization (IVF) has been helping infertile couples get pregnant since 1977. But IVF's cousin, in vitro maturation (IVM), has always been second choice, and perhaps for good reason. Historically, the success rate of IVM has been significantly lower than IVF.

Brain-Training Games Just Make You Good At Brain-Training Games

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Brain-Training Games Just Make You Good At Brain-Training Games

In 2014, there was big-time drama in the scientific world. An international group of scientists published an open letter claiming there was no science to back up claims that brain-training games could improve mental function. A few months later, another group of scientists published their own open letter arguing the exact opposite—there's plenty of evidence that brain training works. Add in the fact that both groups used many of the same studies to back up their claims, and you have an old-fashioned scientific feud on your hands.

The Ivy Lee Method Is The 100-Year-Old Productivity Secret

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The Ivy Lee Method Is The 100-Year-Old Productivity Secret

Procrastination is a stranger to no one, something that a man named Ivy Lee knew quite well. In 19181, Lee, who was a productivity consultant and is regarded as a pioneer in public relations, had a meeting with Charles Schwab, who was one of the richest men in the world at the time. Schwab was looking to up the efficiency of his team. Lee gave Schwab his five-step method, and told Schwab to pay him what he thinks he deserves after three months of his method in action. Ninety days later, Schwab paid Lee the equivalent of $400,000 in today's dollars.