Scientists Turn To The Champ To Make People Cry

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Scientists Turn To The Champ To Make People Cry

What's the world's saddest movie scene? Don't worry about it, science has you covered. In thousands of psychology studies, researchers rely on the final scene of the 1979 film "The Champ" as a tried-and-true way to turn on the waterworks.

You're Happier With A Bronze Medal Than You Are With A Silver One

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You're Happier With A Bronze Medal Than You Are With A Silver One

In Olympic events, the gold, silver, and bronze medal goes to the athlete that did the best, the second best, and the third best, respectively. You'd expect, then, that the bronze, silver, and gold medalist would feel happy, happier, and happiest, right? Strangely, that's not the case. The athlete who wins bronze routinely feels happier than the athlete who wins silver. It all comes down to a quirk of human psychology.Related: Touching Your Teammates Means More Wins

How Hoarders' Brains See Their Belongings

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How Hoarders' Brains See Their Belongings

Hoarders are those who have an uncontrollable urge to accumulate possessions and experience mental anguish at the thought of parting with them. Until 2013, the psychiatry world considered hoarding disorder to be one version of obsessive-compulsive disorder, or OCD. But new research into people's brains changed all that.Related: The Brain's "On" Switch For OCD Has Been Found By Scientists

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from DNews

Celebrities Don't Really Die In Threes, And The New York Times Once Proved It

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Celebrities Don't Really Die In Threes, And The New York Times Once Proved It

Just a few days after a beloved musician died, you hear about the sudden passing of a movie star. Who's going to be next? These things always happen in threes—don't they? Although such a pattern might make the universe feel more predictable, it's unfortunately not the case. Celebrities do not die in threes.Related: The Maternal Bereavement Effect Explains Why Parents Die From Grief

Revenge Really Does Make You Feel Better

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Revenge Really Does Make You Feel Better

When you've been rejected, the idea of "sweet" revenge might actually have a grounding in science. But is retaliation a healthy long-term solution? Related: Jealousy Could Be Good For Your Relationship