HIIT Is The Science-Backed Workout That Can Slash Your Exercise Time

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HIIT Is The Science-Backed Workout That Can Slash Your Exercise Time

We know, you've got a busy schedule. It's probably so busy that you rarely have time to sleep, much less fit in an hour at the gym. But what if you could exercise for a fraction of that time and get the same benefits? Good news: studies show that high-intensity interval training, or HIIT, can get you the benefits of a 45-minute workout in as little as 10 minutes.

The Surprising Ways Stress Affects Your Body

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The Surprising Ways Stress Affects Your Body

Everyone deals with stress some of the time. One of the most popular times? The holidays. Gifts to buy, meals to cook, family drama to dredge up again. It can be a lot to handle. Most of us probably know the telltale symptoms of stress: muscle tension, headaches, sleeplessness, irritability. But it has some more surprising and insidious effects, too.For example, did you know that there's a scientific link between stress and acne? Stress creates an inflammatory response, which can cause otherwise harmlessly clogged pores to turn red and trigger the production of pus, creating unsightly zits. This inflammatory response can also make you more susceptible to colds and other illnesses, according to a 2012 study in PNAS.

Postprandial Somnolence Is The Scientific Term For Food Coma

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Postprandial Somnolence Is The Scientific Term For Food Coma

"I can't believe I ate the whole thing!" That's how it starts. How it ends: a nap on the couch, or at least a very unproductive afternoon. In everyday language, it's known as a food coma, carb coma, or the itis. In scientific terms, it's called postprandial somnolence ("postprandial" means after a meal, "somnolence" means drowsiness. Scientists are so fancy). But why does it happen?

Lack Of Sleep Really Does Make You Eat More

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Lack Of Sleep Really Does Make You Eat More

Late nights and early mornings can make even those with the strongest willpower give in to temptation and head for the drive-thru. But being short on time might not be the only reason you eat badly during busy weeks. According to research, lack of sleep is actually telling your body to eat more.

Tryptophan In Turkey Is Not What Makes You Sleepy

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Tryptophan In Turkey Is Not What Makes You Sleepy

There are many myths surrounding the essential amino acid tryptophan and Thanksgiving dinner. When tryptophan is taken on its own at certain doses on an empty stomach, it can make you sleepy. However, the tryptophan levels in turkey are not what is causing post-meal drowsiness—sleepiness after Thanksgiving dinner is due to the huge quantity of carbohydrates your body received in a single sitting. When you overeat, your body diverts blood to your stomach and the rest of the digestive system to handle the overload. Most American consumes as many or more calories during Thanksgiving dinner than in a single normal day. In addition, there are lower levels of tryptophan in turkey than in chicken.

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Key Facts to Know

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    It is a myth that the tryptophan in turkey is what makes people drowsy after Thanksgiving dinner. 0:21

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    Tryptophan levels in turkey are actually lower than those found in chicken. 1:06

  • 3

    Drowsiness after eating Thanksgiving dinner is caused by an overload of carbohydrates. 1:26