The Sally Who "Sells Seashells By The Seashore" Was Actually a Mary

1 of 13

The Sally Who "Sells Seashells By The Seashore" Was Actually a Mary

It's arguably the most famous tongue-twister: Sally sells seashells by the seashore. But this sentence wasn't just randomly assembled to trip up your tongue. The Sally in this case was based on a real woman named Mary Anning. She has been called one of the greatest fossilists of all time, and the story comes from Anning's hobby of selling rare invertebrate fossils by the seashore. Born in 1799, Anning was a paleontologist who discovered the first complete ichthyosaurus. The fossil was 200 million years old, and Anning was only 12.

The Stegosaurus Was An Ancient Relic To The T.Rex

2 of 13

The Stegosaurus Was An Ancient Relic To The T.Rex

It's a common misconception to lump together all non-avian dinosaurs into a single time period. The truth is, dinosaurs roamed the Earth for a long time, and they all most certainly did not exist together. For example, the stegosaurus roamed the Earth during the late Jurassic period, between 156 and 144 million years ago. On the other hand, the Tyrannosaurus rex lived during the late Cretaceous period, about 67-65 million years ago. The T.rex actually existed closer in history to humans than to the stegosaurus.

What Left These Odd Fossilized Tracks?

3 of 13

What Left These Odd Fossilized Tracks?

At lengths upwards of 6 feet (1.8 m), Arthropleura was the largest land-dwelling arthropod of all time. Its many legs sprouted from around 30 jointed segments covered in armored plating, segments of which have been discovered by paleontologists. Due to its size, Arthropleura probably had few, if any, enemies. Scientists believe that it ate dead plant matter just like its living millipede descendents. These gigantic bugs became extinct when the climate shifted, drying out the sprawling swamps in which they lived.

02:39

from Discovery

Key Facts to Know

  • 1

    The Carboniferous Period lasted from around 360 to 300 million years ago. 0:04

  • 2

    Fossilized tracks of Arthropleura have been found in North America and Scotland. 0:54

  • 3

    Arthropleura is believed to be the largest terrestrial arthropod that has ever existed. 2:01

Dinosaurs Didn't Sound Like You Think They Do

4 of 13

Dinosaurs Didn't Sound Like You Think They Do

Who could forget the terrifying, eardrum-bursting roar of the T.rex in "Jurassic Park"? Though memorable, this movie representation is far from accurate. Scientists believe that dinosaurs probably did not roar, and may have not been able to make any noise at all. The noise may have been closer to the croaking of a crocodile, not a loud, booming roar. The voice boxes of birds and crocodiles, who share dinosaur ancestors, may have evolved independently. This would mean that the last common ancestor of birds and crocodilians might not have been able to vocalize in any way, meaning too that dinosaurs had no way of vocalizing.

04:15

from DNews

Key Facts to Know

  • 1

    "Jurassic Park" creators combined the sounds of a baby elephant, alligator, and tiger for the dinosaurs' roars. 0:00

  • 2

    Birds use an organ called the syrinx to make vocalizations. 1:36

  • 3

    Some dinosaurs had massive, resonating crests on top of their heads connected to their breathing tracts which amplified sounds. 2:31

Sharks Have Been Around For Longer Than Trees

5 of 13

Sharks Have Been Around For Longer Than Trees

The earliest sharks swam through Earth's oceans around 420 to 450 million years ago, a time when there were no true trees on land. Paleontologists can trace the history of sharks this far back by examining fossilized shark teeth and scales. About 370 million years ago, sharks appeared in forms that we would find familiar today, though some had spines and bizarre, flat-topped fins.

02:40

Key Facts to Know

  • 1

    Sharks have existed for about 200 times longer than modern humans. 0:35

  • 2

    Sharks have survived five major mass extinction events on Earth. 0:56

  • 3

    The Megalodon shark could have reached 20 meters in length. 1:43