The Mysterious Smudge On Edvard Munch's "The Scream" Is Actually Candle Wax

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The Mysterious Smudge On Edvard Munch's "The Scream" Is Actually Candle Wax

Though it's one of the most well known and widely recognized pieces of art in history, Edvard Munch's painting "The Scream" spent decades shrouded in mystery. Just to the left of the figure in the painting, near its shoulder, is a small white smudge of a mysterious substance. For years, it was rumored that this splatter was bird poop (Munch was known to paint outdoors and store his paintings outside). In August 2016, scientists at the University of Antwerp in Belgium analyzed the mysterious mark on the 1890 painting and determined that it is actually candle wax. The smudged painting is the first of four versions Munch painted of this scene. The researchers used a system they developed called a Macro-X-ray fluorescence scanner in order to analyze the splatter. This non-invasive technology has been used to solve other art mysteries in the works of artists Jan Van Eyck, Peter Paul Rubens, and Vincent van Gogh. Learn about the history and inspiration of "The Scream" in the video below.

Is This Computer The Next Rembrandt?

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Is This Computer The Next Rembrandt?

Art history buffs would probably say that 17th-century Dutch master Rembrandt was one of a kind -- and they would be right. Sort of. A team of researchers from institutions like Microsoft and ING Bank have developed a computer program to replicate the artist's style with near-perfect accuracy. Researchers, computer programmers, and art historians worked together for two years putting together the New Rembrandt project, a computer algorithm that studied various aspects of Rembrandt's style to create a new "Rembrandt" painting. The computer algorithm took into account the way the master spatially placed facial features, his application of paint, the style of his brushstrokes, and much more. The new "Rembrandt" painting, which took 18 months to create, was unveiled in Amsterdam in early April 2016.

In Mexico, Paintings Can Pay Your Taxes

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In Mexico, Paintings Can Pay Your Taxes

Founded in 1957, the Mexican Pago en Especie program enables registered artists to submit art as their income taxes. Paintings, sculptures, and other graphic arts are accepted, but they must be approved by a committee to ensure their quality. The amount of art that an artist contributes is determined by how much art they sold during the year.

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Key Facts to Know

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    Every year in Mexico, about 700 registered artists pay their income taxes with artwork. 0:30

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    Due to the Pago en Especie program, the Mexican government's collection of art has grown to more than 7,000 works. 1:35

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    The Mexican government is not allowed to sell any of the art they receive as taxes. 1:59

How Did Bob Ross Paint 30,000 Paintings?

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How Did Bob Ross Paint 30,000 Paintings?

From 1983 to 1994, Bob Ross taught people all over the world how to paint. He demonstrated easy-to-learn techniques on his PBS show, The Joy of Painting, which familiarized viewers with his soothing voice and many catchphrases. He encouraged all of his students not to copy his work, but to find and cultivate their own creativity, and to remain playful as they experimented with art. Ross's final episode of The Joy of Painting aired in May, 1994 and he died at 52 years old in July 2015. We've collected some awesome videos on this topic. Watch them now to learn more.

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from Bob Ross

Key Facts to Know

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    Watch Bob Ross create an evergreen tree using a fan brush: 0:08

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    Watch Bob Ross add highlights and depth to evergreen trees: 2:38

25 of the Most Expensive Paintings in History

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25 of the Most Expensive Paintings in History

For the price of the most expensive Jackson Pollock painting ever sold, you could buy several private islands.

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from list25

Key Facts to Know

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    In 1989 Pablo Picasso sold this painting for $70 million. 0:36

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    The "Portrait Of Adele Block Bauer II" by Gustav Klimt sold for nearly $88 million. 5:08

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    Vincent Van Gogh painted "Irises" while confined in an asylum for people suffering with mental illness, but the painting sold for $101.2 million after his death. 6:28