Fish Don't Get Electrocuted Because Lightning Rarely Strikes Over The Ocean, For One Thing

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Fish Don't Get Electrocuted Because Lightning Rarely Strikes Over The Ocean, For One Thing

You're never supposed to use a hairdryer in the bathtub because the electric shock could kill you. So what happens to fish when lightning strikes? Why don't thunderstorms routinely kill off every animal in the sea?

The Jacuzzi Of Despair Is A Deadly Lake Within The Gulf Of Mexico

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The Jacuzzi Of Despair Is A Deadly Lake Within The Gulf Of Mexico

A jacuzzi is the picture of warm, bubbling, soothing relaxation. It's a luxury. But tweak the scene to make those steamy bubbles full of methane and that hot, clear water a thick, briney stew and you have yourself the "jacuzzi of despair." This underwater brine pool in the Gulf of Mexico is no vacation spot—it's a toxic pocket of seawater that will certainly kill anything that swims into it. Hopefully we didn't just ruin jacuzzis for you...

The Bermuda Triangle Is No Mystery

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The Bermuda Triangle Is No Mystery

The area of ocean between Florida, Puerto Rico, and Bermuda known as the Bermuda Triangle is the source of much mystery. Over the centuries, reports of ships and planes vanishing without a trace have haunted the public consciousness, leading the zone to be nicknamed "The Devil's Triangle." Suggested causes for these mysterious disappearances run the gamut from strange natural phenomena to underwater alien bases, but there's a more basic question to ask: do more crafts really disappear in the Bermuda Triangle than in any similarly trafficked area? For decades, we've known that the answer is no.

Greenland Sharks May Be The World's Longest-Living Vertebrates

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Greenland Sharks May Be The World's Longest-Living Vertebrates

Biologists have long suspected that Greenland sharks were ancient animals, but it wasn't until a study published in August 2016 that we knew how old they really were. In the case of one Greenland shark, that turned out to be around 400 years. But without driver's licenses or tree rings to consult, how did the scientists know how old the animals were? The process was understandably tricky.After collecting Greenland sharks that had died from becoming ensnared in fishing nets, the team examined the animals' eye lenses for carbon-14. Carbon-14 is an isotope that filled the atmosphere during the nuclear testing of the 1950s and has diminished at a predictable rate in the years since. This makes it a great marker for the year a cell came into being, since scientists just need to see how much carbon-14 is present, then find the year that quantity matches up with. Using this process, scientists determined that three of their smaller sharks had been born in 1963 or later. By combining that with the knowledge that newborn Greenland sharks are 42 cm (16.5 in) long, they were able to estimate how many centimeters per year the sharks grow, then correlate standard radiocarbon dating with the size of each shark to determine its age. The largest shark was 392, plus or minus 150 years. What's more surprising still is that the size of most pregnant females means that the animals must be at least 150 years old before they reach breeding age. Learn more about these ancient ocean dwellers with the videos below.

The Science Behind "Red Sky At Night"

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The Science Behind "Red Sky At Night"

The phrase "red sky at night, sailors' delight; red sky at morning, sailors take warning" is a common rule of thumb for keeping tabs on the weather. Even the Bible gives it a mention: Matthew 16:2-3 says, "When it is evening, ye say, fair weather: for the heaven is red. And in the morning, foul weather today for the heaven is red and lowering." It may surprise you to learn that this saying has scientific validity. In the mid latitudes, weather systems tend to travel from east to west. Red skies occur when sunlight is scattered through suspended particles in the atmosphere, which are at their greatest in the sorts of high-pressure systems that bring the best weather. So if a bad weather system was leaving as the sun sets in the west, the sun would illuminate the departing clouds around the western horizon and create a "red sky at night." Likewise, if a bad weather system was moving in as the sun rises in the east, the sun would illuminate the approaching mid- and high-level clouds to create a "red sky at morning." We've collected some awesome videos on this topic. Watch them now to learn more.