Detox Products Are Nothing But A Sham

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Detox Products Are Nothing But A Sham

Do not believe what the commercials and food labels are telling you—detoxing your body is not a thing. Although "detox" is a hot word in the healthy living industry, don't be fooled. Your liver, kidneys, skin, and other organs are doing all the detoxifying your body needs. If your body actually contained all the built-up toxins that marketers mention in commercials and promotions, you'd be in need of immediate medical attention. Or dead.

When It Comes To Nutrition, Canned And Frozen Produce Is Often Better

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When It Comes To Nutrition, Canned And Frozen Produce Is Often Better

In the frozen aisle. In reality, however, the opposite is often true: frozen and canned produce can have many more nutrients than its fresh counterparts. That's because the moment produce is picked, its nutrients start to degrade. Plucking a fruit or vegetable from the tree, bush, or vine takes it away from its food source, so it starts using up its own nutrients to stay alive. The produce you find in the grocery store may have taken days or weeks to get there and experienced significant nutrient changes as a result. In order to keep it from spoiling before reaching its destination, fresh produce is also usually picked before it's ripe, so it doesn't even contain all the nutrients it could. Canned and frozen produce, on the other hand, is processed right when it's ripe, so its nutrients are locked in and aren't given much of a chance to degrade over time.Then why do people say the opposite? It's true that canning and even freezing can expose fruits and vegetables to some amount of heat, which can destroy nutrients. But compared to the natural degradation that fresh produce experiences, that nutrient loss is often pretty minimal. The biggest losses are in water-soluble vitamins like vitamin B and C; according to a systematic review in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, broccoli loses 13% of its vitamin C when refrigerated for 21 days but a whopping 50% when frozen. But it found that other nutrients, in particular antioxidants like polyphenols, hardly degrade at all in freezing and canning processes. Of course, processing always leaves room for unhealthy additives like sodium, and produce picked and eaten that day is healthier than any alternative. But in general, there's no need to avoid canned or frozen produce. When it comes to fruits and vegetables, the amount you eat is more important than the form they take. Learn more about the science of food storage with the videos below.

Eat Fruits And Veggies To Boost Your Happiness

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Eat Fruits And Veggies To Boost Your Happiness

It's common knowledge that fruits and vegetables are vital parts of a nutritious diet. Recent research shows strong evidence that eating fruits and veggies provides even more positive benefits than just for your physical health. Reported in July 2016, researchers at the University of Warwick found evidence that eating fruits and vegetables is associated with a substantial increase in happiness levels. In the study, happiness increased for each extra daily portion of fruit and vegetables up to eight portions per day. This was one of the first major scientific attempts to look at the link between eating fruits and vegetables and positive psychological effects. Some researchers believe there is a link between optimism and blood levels of carotenoid, which is present in many fruits and vegetables, although more research is needed. We've collected some awesome videos on this topic. Watch them now to learn more.

The 200 Food Decisions You Don't Know You're Making

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The 200 Food Decisions You Don't Know You're Making

How many decisions did you make about your last meal? If you're like most people, you probably think just one: what to eat. But if you delve into that experience, many more decisions appear. How much did you serve yourself? What dish did you use? Where did you sit down to eat? When did you stop eating? Why? For a 2007 study published in Environment and Behavior, Cornell researcher Brian Wansink and his team asked participants to estimate how many decisions about food and drinks they made in a given day. Then the researchers asked 18 more questions about what, when, where, how much, and with whom the participants ate and drank. While most people estimated they made around 15 decisions a day, the study found that they actually made 219 decisions on average -- around 200 more than they thought. These results point to how mindlessly we eat, and how easily our diets can be influenced by our environment.

How To Tell When There's Added Sugar In Your Food

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How To Tell When There's Added Sugar In Your Food

Recent nutritional guidelines have urged consumers to eat less sugar, since high sugar consumption is linked to medical conditions such as obesity, diabetes, and tooth decay, among others. But even when you stay away from candy and sodas, it can be surprisingly difficult to determine whether the food you eat contains added sugar. In 2015, a team of researchers found that 60% of food purchased in U.S. grocery stores includes some form of added sugar. No wonder it took a team of researchers to make the discovery: much of this sugar shows up on ingredients lists in unrecognizable forms, such as "dextrose," "flo-malt," and "clintose." Even natural-sounding ingredients like "cane juice" and "agave nectar" are code words for added sugar. The biggest offender in this area is the innocuous-seeming "fruit juice concentrate," which is juice that's been stripped of nearly everything but sugar.

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Key Facts to Know

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    The American Heart Association recommends that women consume 25g of added sugar a day. 0:08

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    New U.S. nutrition labels will differentiate between naturally occurring and added sugars. 0:27

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    Fruit yogurt can have many grams of sugar, but it's hard to tell how much of that comes from the milk and the fruit, and how much is added. 0:42