You Can Get Away With Murder In Yellowstone's "Zone of Death"

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You Can Get Away With Murder In Yellowstone's "Zone of Death"

From an early age, we learn the laws of our land. If you commit a crime, you have to accept the consequences. But what if crime without consequence actually existed, and it's buried in a loophole of the U.S. Constitution? Yellowstone National Park primarily spans Wyoming, but it also extends to slivers of Montana and Idaho. In a section of that small sliver in Idaho lies the "Zone of Death." Here, you could potentially get away with murder. Sound sensational? Hear us out...

The Jacuzzi Of Despair Is A Deadly Lake Within The Gulf Of Mexico

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The Jacuzzi Of Despair Is A Deadly Lake Within The Gulf Of Mexico

A jacuzzi is the picture of warm, bubbling, soothing relaxation. It's a luxury. But tweak the scene to make those steamy bubbles full of methane and that hot, clear water a thick, briney stew and you have yourself the "jacuzzi of despair." This underwater brine pool in the Gulf of Mexico is no vacation spot—it's a toxic pocket of seawater that will certainly kill anything that swims into it. Hopefully we didn't just ruin jacuzzis for you...

The Bermuda Triangle Is No Mystery

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The Bermuda Triangle Is No Mystery

The area of ocean between Florida, Puerto Rico, and Bermuda known as the Bermuda Triangle is the source of much mystery. Over the centuries, reports of ships and planes vanishing without a trace have haunted the public consciousness, leading the zone to be nicknamed "The Devil's Triangle." Suggested causes for these mysterious disappearances run the gamut from strange natural phenomena to underwater alien bases, but there's a more basic question to ask: do more crafts really disappear in the Bermuda Triangle than in any similarly trafficked area? For decades, we've known that the answer is no.

Here's What A Chance Of Rain Really Means

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Here's What A Chance Of Rain Really Means

In 2015, The Washington Post polled its readers on their knowledge of weather forecasts. Most readers believed that if the forecast calls for a 60 percent chance of rain, that means that it will rain across 60 percent of the area tomorrow. This is a common belief, but it's only half right. In reality, the chance of rain, or probability of precipitation (POP), is based on a mathematical formula that takes the forecaster's confidence into account. That formula is as follows: POP = Coverage x ConfidenceTo use a very simple example, if a forecaster is 100 percent confident that 40 percent of a given area will see measurable rain, the POP is 40 percent. Of course, 100 percent confidence almost never happens in science, so the formula is often more complicated. What if a forecaster is 50% sure that rain will occur and expects that, if it does occur, 80% of the area will get that rain? 50 percent of 80 percent is 40 percent, so the POP is 40 percent.

The Worst Way To Die In The Wild Is By Cassowary Attack

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The Worst Way To Die In The Wild Is By Cassowary Attack

Nature is beautiful, and also pretty terrifying. Hurricanes, heat waves, tornadoes, lightning strikes, hail storms, earthquakes... we'll stop there. Many natural disasters have claimed lives, but which would be the most excruciating way to go? According to Outside magazine, it's not by drowning or ingesting poison—it's by the attack of a cassowary. What's a cassowary? We're glad you asked...