Go Inside The "Haunted Mansion" In California That Took 40 Years To Build

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Go Inside The "Haunted Mansion" In California That Took 40 Years To Build

When the wealthy twenty-something Sarah Lockwood Pardee married William Wirt Winchester—heir to the company that made the famous Winchester repeating rifle—in 1862, her future looked bright. But in 1866, the couple's infant daughter Annie died of a mysterious disease. Sarah was still in a deep depression from the tragedy when her husband died of tuberculosis 15 years later. Distraught, she sought help from a medium, who told her she was being haunted by spirits that could only be appeased if she moved out west and built them a great house. With a heavy heart, $20 million, and all the time in the world, Sarah Winchester moved to San Jose, California and began construction on what would come to be known as the Winchester Mystery House.

The Bermuda Triangle Is No Mystery

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The Bermuda Triangle Is No Mystery

The area of ocean between Florida, Puerto Rico, and Bermuda known as the Bermuda Triangle is the source of much mystery. Over the centuries, reports of ships and planes vanishing without a trace have haunted the public consciousness, leading the zone to be nicknamed "The Devil's Triangle." Suggested causes for these mysterious disappearances run the gamut from strange natural phenomena to underwater alien bases, but there's a more basic question to ask: do more crafts really disappear in the Bermuda Triangle than in any similarly trafficked area? For decades, we've known that the answer is no.

These Hidden Treasures Are Yet To Be Found

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These Hidden Treasures Are Yet To Be Found

Buried treasure is usually stuff of fiction, appearing only in pirate stories and adventure legends. But many treasures are anything but fictional. Take the treasure chest hidden in the Rocky Mountains by former archaeologist and art dealer Forrest Fenn. Fenn hid the chest in the midst of the Great Recession to get people out into nature, and he published a mysterious poem full of clues as to its whereabouts to entice would-be treasure hunters. Likewise, it's confirmed that the Nazis sunk containers into Lake Toplitz in the Austrian Alps in the last few months of World War II—many of these have already been recovered, though they contained more munitions and documents than gold and riches. While some believe there aren't any more containers to be found, that probably won't stop explorers from venturing into its watery depths in hopes of finding something of value.

D. B. Cooper's Case Has Been Closed By The FBI After 45 Years

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D. B. Cooper's Case Has Been Closed By The FBI After 45 Years

In 1971, a strange man who called himself Dan Cooper boarded a plane in Oregon that was headed to Seattle. During the flight, he calmly handed notes to a stewardess with a few demands written on it. Most notably, Cooper wanted $200,000 and told the stewardess he had a bomb in his suitcase. The plane landed, Cooper freed the plane's 36 passengers in Seattle for a sum of $200,000 cash, and instructed the flight crew to head to New Mexico. Mid-flight with the ransom money, Cooper parachuted out and was never found.No one knows where D.B. Cooper ended up, or really much about him at all. The FBI officially closed the case after 45 years of searching for details about the man, calling it one of the longest and most exhaustive investigations in the organization's history. In the first five years of the investigation, the FBI had interviewed roughly 800 potential suspects. And now the search is officially over. Check out the video below for more info on this mystery.

Mysterious Space Noises Picked Up By A NASA Student Balloon Experiment

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Mysterious Space Noises Picked Up By A NASA Student Balloon Experiment

Sounds that were recorded on August 9, 2014 from the edge of space are special for a few reasons. First of all, no one knows the source. Second, it was the first time infrasounds had been captured from the edge of space in 50 years. On that August day in 2014, a balloon that was created by a university student for a NASA experiment traveled up to the edge of the stratosphere and picked up strange noises roughly 22 miles (36 kilometers) above Earth's surface. The balloon was designed and built by Daniel Bowman, a graduate student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.These noises are only audible to the human ear after they are sped up, because the atmospheric infrasounds are sound waves at frequencies below 20 hertz. Once audible, the sounds are almost reminiscent of "The X Files" theme music — or maybe that's just the imagination at work. Researchers have yet to nail down the exact source of these sounds, but there are theories as to what caused the noises captured above New Mexico. The sounds may be the result of a wind farm beneath the balloon's flight path, ocean waves, wind turbulence, gravity waves, clear air turbulence, or vibrations from the balloon cable. Watch the video below to hear the sounds for yourself.