There Are 20,000 Human Skeletons Beneath The Museum Of London

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There Are 20,000 Human Skeletons Beneath The Museum Of London

The Museum of London is one of the city's most popular tourist attractions. But there's something only few of the visitors know: beneath their feet are thousands upon thousands of human skeletons. Those skeletons are part of the collection housed in the museum's Centre for Human Bioarchaeology, and they're there to help archaeologists and historians delve into the history of London and of humanity as a whole. At 20,000 specimens strong, the collection includes remains from nearly every point in London's history, from the Neolithic period to the mid-19th century, and this gives scholars unique insight into how humans lived throughout the ages. From examining burial traditions to learning about how industrialization changed human health, the skeletons have provided a wealth of information. Much of the data about these skeletons is publicly available on the Wellcome Osteological Research Database, which provides descriptions and photographs of the centre's human specimens and the places they were found. Learn more about what skeletons can teach us in the videos below.

The Moon's First Piece Of Art May Have Been The Moon Museum

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The Moon's First Piece Of Art May Have Been The Moon Museum

There might be Andy Warhol artwork on the moon, but it's hard to know for sure. Doesn't this sound like something people would be certain of? Perhaps the reason no one really knows is because the whole operation to get it there was super secret and, well, illegal. But the scandalous tale is not only believable, it's pretty likely.

The National Museum of African American History And Culture Spent A Century In Waiting

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The National Museum of African American History And Culture Spent A Century In Waiting

In 1915, a group of black veterans of the U.S. Civil War began to push for a memorial dedicated to black soldiers and servicemembers. In September 2016—more than a century later—that museum finally opened. Along the way, the National Museum of African American History And Culture faced roadblock after roadblock: Representative Leonidas C. Dyer introduced a bill that called for a commission to begin the project in 1916, then drafted another bill in 1919 proposing to erect the monument in the capital. Neither effort succeeded in getting funds. In 1929, legislation was passed to create the kind of commission Representative Dyer had proposed, but funding was even harder to come by in the Depression-era economy and the project was again put on hold. It wasn't until 1986 that Congress took up the topic again and passed a joint resolution supporting private efforts to build the museum, but politics soon impeded that effort as well. Finally, in 2003, Congress Passed the National Museum of African American History And Culture Act and got the ball rolling on its construction. The 400,000-square-foot Washington D.C. museum broke ground in 2012 as a three-tiered, bronze-colored building in a sea of white marble monuments. It opened to the public on September 24, 2016. Today, the museum showcases more than 35,000 artifacts and gives visitors a place to reflect on the evils of slavery and Jim Crow, explore the history of the Civil Rights movement, and absorb African-American music, dance, and literature. Learn more about the historic nature of this historical monument with the videos below.

The Museum of Broken Relationships Is A Monument To Failed Love

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The Museum of Broken Relationships Is A Monument To Failed Love

Things are often displayed in museums for the value they bring to the public, but at the Museum of Broken Relationships, the greatest meaning belongs to the people who gave the pieces away. The museum was conceived in Croatia by film producer Olinka Vištica and artist Dražen Grubišić. The idea occurred to them when the two had just broken up and had to decide what to do with the objects left over from their four-year relationship. "We thought, 'Wouldn't it be great if there was a museum where you could keep those things, and they could tell your story in a way that will help you?'" Grubišić recalled in an interview with the Denver paper Westword. And so, The Museum of Broken Relationships was born.

Museo Atlantico, An Underwater Museum, Highlights Global Issues

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Museo Atlantico, An Underwater Museum, Highlights Global Issues

Sitting on the ocean floor in the Atlantic is something unexpected: Museo Atlantico, Europe's first underwater museum. British artist Jason deCaires Taylor created nearly 400 cement sculptures and dropped them into the museum's underwater space in February 2016. But the underwater aspect was not meant to be the most notable aspect of the museum; Museo Atlantico sends a powerful message.Taylor, who has created similar installations in Mexico and the Bahamas, aimed to spark controversy with Museo Atlantico. The underwater statues reference social issues that impact the worldwide community, including the growing concern over climate change. One of the statues depicts a raft of refugees fleeing to a new home. The museum is eco-friendly, too. All of the sculptures are also artificial reefs. As of February 2016, the museum is accessible for snorkelers and divers to view. Watch the video below to see the museum.