For Doctors, Lack Of Sleep Might Be Better Than The Alternative

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For Doctors, Lack Of Sleep Might Be Better Than The Alternative

Have you ever wondered why, when they're so important to the survival of so many, medical professionals need to work longer hours than your average truck driver? It all comes down to statistics: between going home for the night and handing off your patient to another doctor, or sticking around and working without sleep, the latter may just be safer.

Giving Your Kids Medicine? First, Double Check The Dose

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Giving Your Kids Medicine? First, Double Check The Dose

It's remarkably common to give the wrong medication dose to your kids. In fact, studies show parents give the wrong dosage 47% of the time.

Worried About Getting The Flu? Your Risk Is Tied To The Year You Were Born

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Worried About Getting The Flu? Your Risk Is Tied To The Year You Were Born

We have good news, and we have bad news. The good news is that the particular flu you were exposed to as a child probably gives you protection from several flu strains as an adult. The bad news is that it doesn't protect against all the others, and this makes it really hard to make a universal flu vaccine.

AIDS-Related Deaths Are On A Steep Decline

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AIDS-Related Deaths Are On A Steep Decline

It was 1981 when physicians began reporting that gay men were suffering from rare illnesses usually seen only in people with severely weakened immune systems. The mysterious condition that caused it was called acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, and experts soon realized that it could affect anyone, regardless of gender or sexual orientation. It rapidly became an epidemic. At its peak, AIDS was responsible for 50,876 annual deaths in the United States. That was in 1995. A lot has changed since then. Antiretroviral drugs have been developed to fight AIDS by suppressing its associated virus, HIV. These drugs not only make it possible for people with HIV to live just as long as someone who's not infected, but they've even been shown to keep HIV from spreading to others. A 2011 study found that HIV-infected but otherwise healthy people who take antiretrovirals can limit their transmission of the virus by 96 percent, and a 2010 study found that even uninfected men can take the drugs preventatively to reduce their risk of infection.

How Alonzo Clemons Overcame A Brain Injury To Become A World-Class Sculptor

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How Alonzo Clemons Overcame A Brain Injury To Become A World-Class Sculptor

You've probably dabbled with Play-Doh as a kid. Most people's sculpting experience ends around there, but that wasn't the case for Alonzo Clemons. Severely disabled as a young child, Clemons could barely speak, nor could he feed himself or tie his own shoes. But his disability brought on one important gift—acquired savant syndrome, a condition where high-level, often prodigious skills appear after a brain injury. This gave Clemons an uncanny ability to create hyper-accurate sculptures of animals that started from a young age and only sharpened as he grew up. Today, he can simply glance at a horse on TV and, in just 20 minutes, sculpt a clay figure of that horse that is anatomically correct down to every muscle. Despite his still very limited vocabulary, Clemons has shown his work throughout the world. Hear Clemons speak about his work in the video below.