Couples Who Drink Together Stay Together

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Couples Who Drink Together Stay Together

Relationships tend to be happier when partners share pastimes, whether that's watching a favorite TV show or training for a triathlon. Research now shows that drinking -- or the lack thereof -- counts in those pastimes. A 2013 study in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research found that couples with similar drinking habits are happier. The flipside was also true: relationships where one partner drinks and the other abstains have a higher divorce rate. Interestingly, when the wife is the one who does the drinking, that risk shoots even higher. The 2013 study was of many age groups, but a 2016 study in the Journals of Gerontology that only looked at couples over 50 also found this to be true. Matched drinking habits may be a sign of a compatible couple, rather than the cause, since couples who share drinking habits are likely to share other activities at the same time. This isn't to say that drinking doesn't have its drawbacks. The 2013 study found that couples with two heavy drinkers had a higher risk of divorce than those with light drinkers, even though they shared drinking habits. We've collected some awesome videos on this topic. Watch them now to learn more.

Sharing Household Chores May Be The Key To A Happy Marriage

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Sharing Household Chores May Be The Key To A Happy Marriage

Today, the majority of women in the United States work outside of the home. But that hasn't always been the case. In 1950, only 34% of women worked outside of the home, with presumably a good chunk of the remaining percentage dedicating their time to raising children. However, that percentage jumped to 60% by 2010. But despite women's increased participation in the labor force, they were still expected to take responsibility for most of the household chores and childcare. By the '70s, working women were blamed for the rising divorce rate -- their jobs contributed an added stress that marriages supposedly couldn't handle. A more recent study found that heterosexual married couples in which men do more household chores are less likely to divorce. The study showed that sharing housework may be key to a happier marriage.

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from Vox

Key Facts to Know

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    According to a 2012 study, 58% of women in the U.S. work. 0:02

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    Heterosexual married couples in which men do more household chores are less likely to divorce, according to a study. 1:34

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    The more time men spend with their children, the happier both partners are with the relationship, according to a study. 1:40

Why Hasidic Jewish Women Shave Their Heads

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Why Hasidic Jewish Women Shave Their Heads

The wardrobes of Hasidic Jewish men and women are very strict with historical roots. Hasidic Judaism was found in 18th century Eastern Europe, and a lot of the Hasidic wardrobe stems from the dress of that time. The men are easily identified, as they must wear black pants, white shirts, and black jackets. They also have long beards and curls on either side of their heads called payots. The women must dress modestly in long skirts, and must have sleeves longer than elbow-length. Because hair on the head is seen as a very beautiful symbol, it is covered to create privacy. Uncovered hair in the culture is equated to physical nudity. After marriage, many Hasidic Jewish women shave their heads as a symbol of fidelity and a way to denote they are off the market. Wigs are common for women with and without shaved heads, as it covers the head to create privacy and modesty.

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Key Facts to Know

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    Brooklyn has the largest Hasidic Jewish population in the United States. 0:00

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    Hasidic women are not allowed to wear pants. 0:41

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    Hasidic culture equates uncovered women's hair to physical nudity. 1:49

The Black Wedding Dresses Of Spanish Brides

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The Black Wedding Dresses Of Spanish Brides

Queen Victoria was the first royal bride to wear all white to her wedding ceremony in 1842, sparking the tradition of the "white wedding." Before this wedding in Europe, brides wore whatever color they pleased on their wedding day. However, traditional Roman Catholic brides in Spanish cultures wore black wedding dresses for a slightly morbid reason—to symbolize their devotion to marriage until death.

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Key Facts to Know

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    Queen Victoria began the "white wedding" trend when she married in 1842. 0:08

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    Traditional Irish brides wear blue dresses, which symbolize purity. 0:44

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    Traditional brides in China wear red gowns to symbolize good luck. 1:39

In A Ghost Marriage, Both Bride And Groom Are Deceased

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In A Ghost Marriage, Both Bride And Groom Are Deceased

Ghost marriages typically occur in rural China, where people have been arrested for digging up and selling the bodies of women to the families of deceased bachelors. Matchmakers can even be called upon to find a spouse for a man who has recently passed. The practice has allegedly been around since the 17th century BC, but is very rare today.

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Key Facts to Know

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    The phrase "skeletons in the closet" originated in the 1800s, when anatomists would hire body-snatchers to fetch corpses from graves for dissection. 0:25

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    In China, people were arrested for digging up the bodies of deceased women and selling them for ghost marriages. 1:13

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    The British version of "skeletons in the closet" is "skeletons in the cupboard." 1:50