Jealousy Could Be Good For Your Relationship

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Jealousy Could Be Good For Your Relationship

Jealousy is a normal, common, and often terribly uncomfortable human emotion. With the rise of social media, there are new opportunities to become jealous around every corner. But it turns out that jealousy may not be the relationship killer we think it is—admitting jealous feelings could even strengthen a romantic bond.Evolutionary psychologists think that jealousy is an evolutionary mechanism to help humans ward off "mate-poaching." A 2013 study in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships that had couples keep diaries of their and their partners' temptations, their feelings of commitment, and any "mate-guarding" behaviors taken, and found that people could tell pretty accurately when their partner was tempted. At the same time, however, the couples reported feeling more committed to the relationship when they had taken measures to guard their sweetie from temptation.

The Museum of Broken Relationships Is A Monument To Failed Love

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The Museum of Broken Relationships Is A Monument To Failed Love

Things are often displayed in museums for the value they bring to the public, but at the Museum of Broken Relationships, the greatest meaning belongs to the people who gave the pieces away. The museum was conceived in Croatia by film producer Olinka Vištica and artist Dražen Grubišić. The idea occurred to them when the two had just broken up and had to decide what to do with the objects left over from their four-year relationship. "We thought, 'Wouldn't it be great if there was a museum where you could keep those things, and they could tell your story in a way that will help you?'" Grubišić recalled in an interview with the Denver paper Westword. And so, The Museum of Broken Relationships was born.

How Do You Know Your Dog Really Loves You?

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How Do You Know Your Dog Really Loves You?

You can't exactly ask your dog if they love you and expect a black-or-white answer. Luckily, neuroscientist and author Gregory Burns has identified ways for you to test if your dog really loves you. With a team of researchers from Emory University, Burns looked at dogs' brains with an MRI and identified parts that are associated with positive emotions. Without an MRI, Burns says you can tell your dog loves you if it: cuddles with you after meals, sleeps with you, is happy when you come home, and has love reciprocated by you.

Your Brain In Love

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Your Brain In Love

After scanning the brains of 100 students from Southwest University in China, researchers discovered differences in brain activity between those who were in love, those who weren't in love, and those who had recently broken up with someone they loved. Participants in the study were told to think of "nothing" during the scans, enabling the scientists to get a better idea of their everyday brain activity.

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Key Facts to Know

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    Love is intertwined with the evolutionary survival of the human race. 0:19

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    The brain of someone in love looks similar to the brain of someone on cocaine. 0:44

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    There is a surge of dopamine and norepinephrine during orgasm and when we look at pictures of those we love. 1:21

Taj Mahal: A Labor of Love

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Taj Mahal: A Labor of Love

The Taj Mahal is considered one of the wonders of the world, and some believe its architectural beauty will never be surpassed.