Sorry, But The Crab In Your California Rolls Is Probably Just Fish

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Sorry, But The Crab In Your California Rolls Is Probably Just Fish

What's your favorite type of sushi? If you're a maki lover, you might be partial to the California roll. Mmm...the delicious cucumber, avocado, and processed, colored fish paste. That's right: that tender "crab" in your roll is real seafood, but it likely isn't real crab. Instead, it's imitation crab, or "crab stick." In Japanese, crab stick is called "surimi," which means "ground meat." Every time you eat imitation crab, you're actually eating a paste of Alaska pollock, Atlantic cod, Tilapia, or another mild white fish.

Gujō, Japan Is The Capital Of Artificial Foods

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Gujō, Japan Is The Capital Of Artificial Foods

Have you ever looked at a restaurant's menu and wished you could see the food before you order? Is the lobster ravioli worth the price, or will you be stuffing your face on fast food later? Perhaps, instead, you've traveled to a new country and had no idea what you were ordering, opting to trust your blind intuition. The Japanese have figured this out, and it comes in the form of beautiful and lifelike artificial foods.In the ancient city of Gujō, Japan, one of the top tourist attractions is the world-renowned food replica factory. Yes, you read that correctly. The artificial food, or sampuru, business began in 1917 in Gujo Hachiman (now Gujō), Japan. There's a romanticized legend that Japan's father of fake food, Takizo Iwasaki, simply had an epiphany one day as he sat with his ill wife by candlelight and was inspired by the melting wax. The more likely story is that he wanted to replicate the success of the wax skin and organ replicas that were used for medical studies at the time by being a pioneer in the food industry.

This Japanese Soldier Fought WWII For 29 Years After It Ended

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This Japanese Soldier Fought WWII For 29 Years After It Ended

Hiroo Onoda might have been the most dedicated and obedient soldier in history. The Japanese soldier enlisted in the Imperial Japanese army in 1942 at the age of 20. Two years later, he was deployed to the Philippines and ordered to protect the occupied island from enemy attack. He was also ordered to "never surrender," a command he took quite seriously. Onoda continued fighting the war from the Philippines for 29 years after World War II ended because he didn't believe the Japanese had surrendered. Even when pamphlets were dropped to alert Japanese guerrilla soldiers that the war was over, Onoda was convinced it was just a trick by the Americans. It wasn't until 1974, when his commanding officer came to the island to find Onoda and ordered him to surrender, that Onoda finally gave up and went back home to Japan. He died in Tokyo in January, 2016.

Sumo Wrestlers Making Babies Cry Means Good Health in Japan

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Sumo Wrestlers Making Babies Cry Means Good Health in Japan

A crying baby is a stressful sight for a mother, right? Not the case during one 400-year-old Japanese festival. During a ritual called Nakizumo, sumo wrestlers aim to make infants cry, which some Japanese parents believe will result in good health and fortune for their children. The ritual is a competition, and the first baby to cry wins. If neither baby cries, the matches end with a chorus of "Banzai raku!" which means "Live long." The ritual is held at different shrines all around the country, but the rules may vary from region to region. As Yoshimi Morita, a priest at one of the shrines, told the AFP news agency, "The babies' cries are intended to reach God and parents hope that their little ones will grow healthy and strong."

This Math Problem Went Viral In Japan

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This Math Problem Went Viral In Japan

Can you solve the viral Japanese math problem? It's an order of operations problem that, supposedly, about 60% of Japanese twentysomethings can correctly solve, which is a rate down from 90% of twentysomethings in the 1980s. Here's the problem: 9-3÷1/3+1. How did you go about solving this, and what did you get as your final answer?