The People Of North Sentinel Island Make Up One Of The Last Uncontacted Tribes

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The People Of North Sentinel Island Make Up One Of The Last Uncontacted Tribes

In the Bay of Bengal, off the coast of India, lies North Sentinel Island. This island, which has been separated from any mainland for 65,000 years, is home to a mysterious and hostile human population. There are an estimated 50 to 500 people on North Sentinel Island, but because outsider attempts to reach the island have been met with extreme hostility, those numbers may be inaccurate. When the British Empire was attempting to invade the island, they kidnapped elderly members of the tribe and children. The elderly died almost immediately, which spawned the legend that the North Sentinelese can't survive outside their home island. The children were eventually returned to the island, and the British invasion was unsuccessful.

08:21

Key Facts to Know

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    The people of North Sentinel Island are one of the most isolated group of people on Earth. 1:16

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    The isolated people of North Sentinel Island speak an unintelligible language that not even nearby tribes can decipher. 5:01

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    The Indian government has banned any and all contact with the isolated people of North Sentinel Island. 5:15

The "Tree Lobster" Has Been Secretly Living On This Island

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The "Tree Lobster" Has Been Secretly Living On This Island

Ball's Pyramid sits alone, ominously, off the eastern coast of Australia. The steep, rocky island is home to the rarest insect on Earth: the Lord Howe stick insect, also known as the tree lobster and the walking sausage. It used to live on Lord Howe's Island, which is near Ball's Pyramid, but went extinct in just two years when a rat was introduced to the island. After 80 years of scientists assuming the Lord Howe stick insect was extinct, they found the last 24 of the species hiding in a single bush on the nearby Ball's Pyramid. Since then, the population was increased.

03:33

Key Facts to Know

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    Ball's Pyramid—an isolated island off the Australian is home to the world's rarest insect. 0:00

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    The Lord Howe stick insect, the rarest insect on Earth, is also known as the tree lobster and the walking sausage. 0:34

The Now-Abandoned Battleship Island

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The Now-Abandoned Battleship Island

At the end of the 1800s, the Mitsubishi Corporation discovered a one square kilometer island off the coast of Nagasaki, Japan. Hashima Island was situated upon an enormous coal reserve, and the corporation began mining the island. A city was built to support the miners, and a giant sea wall was erected to protect them. The structures gave the island a shape that inspired the nickname of the place: Battleship Island. Unfortunately, the majority of the miners were Chinese and Korean prisoners of war, and were forced to work in very dangerous conditions. At the end of World War II, an estimated 1,300 coal miners had died on the island. Once the Mitsubishi factory closed in the 1970s, all the people left. It has been abandoned ever since.

03:30

Key Facts to Know

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    Hashima Island used to be the most densely populated places in the world, but is now abandoned. 0:00

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    At the end of WWII, an estimated 1,300 miners had died on Hashima Island. 1:00

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    The forced laborers of Hashima Island called it "Jail Island" or "Hell Island." 2:23

The Mysterious Birdman Competition of Easter Island

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The Mysterious Birdman Competition of Easter Island

A rocky island near the coast of Easter Island is home to a huge colony of seabirds. This island was instrumental in the birdman competition done to determine the leader of Easter Island, who would be known as birdman. The birdman religion, or cult, is believed to have begun around 1600 AD. Every 12 months, a young warrior from each clan would race to the island to be the first to retrieve a seabird egg. The clan chief whose warrior won the contest would become a living god on the island for the next 12 months, and would become the birdman.

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Key Facts to Know

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    Easter Islanders in the 19th century provided details of what the birdman competition of the 1600s was like. 0:13

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    The Easter Island birdman competition was a deadly way to determine the leader. 1:06

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    The Easter Island birdman competitors would strap eggs onto headbands in order to bring it back ashore. 2:29

This Japanese Island Is Overrun With Friendly Rabbits

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This Japanese Island Is Overrun With Friendly Rabbits

In the wild, rabbits are constantly on the lookout for impending predators because the only defense against them is to run away, fast. However, the rabbits on the rabbit-overrun Japanese island of Ōkunoshima behave completely differently. Although they are wild, these rabbits immediately rush up to visitors. The Japanese island Ōkunoshima was used to make poison gas during WWII in secrecy, and was thus uninhabited. Lab rabbits were used to test the effects of the gas, and some believe the rabbit population grew from escapees that stayed after the plant was shut down. Records show, however, all the rabbits were destroyed at the end of the war.

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from BBC

Key Facts to Know

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    Wild rabbits have no defenses against predators except the ability to run fast. 0:28

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    The Japanese island Ōkunoshima was used to make poison gas during WWII in secrecy. 1:35

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    The rabbits on the Japanese island Ōkunoshima have no predators anywhere on the island. 2:39