Stephen Hawking Thinks Our History Is That "Of Stupidity"

1 of 17

Stephen Hawking Thinks Our History Is That "Of Stupidity"

Studying the past is really only helpful if you can use it to benefit the future. If you can't learn from the mistakes of yesterday, the same mistakes get repeated. Even so, there's more to life than studying where humanity went wrong. Stephen Hawking made this point when he said, "We spend a great deal of time studying history, which, let's face it, is mostly the history of stupidity. So it's a welcome change that people are studying instead the future of intelligence." Hawking made this comment in an October 2016 lecture at the opening of the Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence (LCFI) at Cambridge University. The center is a multi-disciplinary institute that will look to address the unanswered questions around artificial intelligence.

Meet The First Artificial Animal Made From 3D Printing and Genetic Engineering

2 of 17

Meet The First Artificial Animal Made From 3D Printing and Genetic Engineering

Though it may look just like a stingray, the world's first artificial animal is no animal at all -- not entirely. It's a genetically engineered biohybrid that is part robot and part animal, resulting in a unique creature that represents the future of artificial intelligence. The soft-robotic ray has a small, 3D-printed elastic body, and a gold skeleton that is capable of storing information. The body of the ray is coated in actual living heart cells that, when exposed to light, cause the wings of the ray to flap. This type of technology isn't just for show; it could lead to the development of artificial hearts. This hybrid creature also represents a small step toward the development of synthetic cognition. We've collected some awesome videos on this topic. Watch them now to learn more.

Would You Ride Olli, The 3D-Printed, Self-Driving Minibus?

3 of 17

Would You Ride Olli, The 3D-Printed, Self-Driving Minibus?

You've heard of self-driving cars, but what about 3D-printed, self-driving public transportation? Meet Olli, the first self-driving, cognitive vehicle, powered by IBM Watson technology. This vehicle, created by the company Local Motors, can be 3D-printed in hours. As Local Motors co-founder and chief executive John Rogers told AFP News Agency: "We hope to be able to print this vehicle in about 10 hours and assemble it in another hour." Olli can hold 12 passengers, and the IBM Watson technology allows the bus to respond to "natural language" for autonomous driving. The minibus made its debut in June 2016, and hit the roads of Washington D.C. soon after for a trial run. We've collected some awesome videos on this topic. Watch them now to learn more.

Spacing Out Is Good For You

4 of 17

Spacing Out Is Good For You

Mindlessness over mindfulness? Science says your brain loves both. Forcing your brain to be hyper-focused at all times actually makes you less effective overall. On the flip side, giving your brain a break by literally doing nothing helps your brain be more effective and creative when it's back in concentration mode. The reality is that when you're spacing out, your brain isn't actually idle. During this zone-out time, the Resting State Network (RSN) in your brain becomes engaged and organized. This state sees increased blood flow to your brain, giving it the extra juice to be more creative right away. We've collected some awesome videos on this topic. Watch them now to learn more.

The Shocking 30 Million Word Gap

5 of 17

The Shocking 30 Million Word Gap

A family's socioeconomic status affects more than just their lifestyle, it can also impact the intellectual development of children as early as 18 months old. Researchers Betty Hart and Todd Risley identified what they call "The 30 Million Word Gap," which shows that children in higher income families will hear approximately 30 million more words than children in families on welfare by the time they are three years old. The researchers found that these discrepancies are even visible in children's brain scans. And this gap doesn't just disappear after age three: hearing additional words so early in life leads to higher IQs and more academic success later.