Millennials May Be The Least Religious Generation, And It's Not Because They're Young

1 of 55

Millennials May Be The Least Religious Generation, And It's Not Because They're Young

A new study says that millennials are the least religious generation in at least 60 years—and possibly ever. This makes the future of religion in the United States an open question.

Why Early Birds Can't Be Trusted Late In The Day (Sort Of)

2 of 55

Why Early Birds Can't Be Trusted Late In The Day (Sort Of)

You're more likely to lie when you're tired.

02:57

from DNews

Key Facts to Know

  • 1

    Morality lives in the right hemisphere of the brain and scientists have found a way to influence our moral compass. 0:28

  • 2

    We are more prone to lie, cheat, and steal in the afternoon. 2:01

These Historical Figures Accomplished Incredible Feats Before Age 30

3 of 55

These Historical Figures Accomplished Incredible Feats Before Age 30

Michelangelo once said, "If people knew how hard I had to work to gain my mastery, it would not seem so wonderful at all." That might make you feel a little better about yourself if you're over the age of 28 and have yet to sculpt one of the most iconic pieces of art in world history. (Michelangelo created both "David" and "Pietà" before his 28th birthday.) Sure, hard work plays a huge role in achieving unbelievable feats, but, as you'll find out below, there's got to be a lot of natural talent and ability at play here too...

Yisrael Kristal, Once The World's Oldest Man, Had His Bar Mitzvah At Age 113

4 of 55

Yisrael Kristal, Once The World's Oldest Man, Had His Bar Mitzvah At Age 113

In March 2016, a Polish-born Israeli man named Yisrael Kristal was declared by Guinness World Records as the oldest living man on Earth. Later that same year, Kristal finally got around to something that was put off for a whole century: his bar mitzvah. In November 2016, the 113-year-old man celebrated the Jewish coming-of-age ritual exactly 100 years late. Better (very, very) late than never, huh?

The Liar Paradox Is A Self-Referential Conundrum

5 of 55

The Liar Paradox Is A Self-Referential Conundrum

The liar paradox, also known as the liar sentence, states "this sentence is false." If that statement makes you go a little crazy, you're not the first one. The liar paradox first came about in ancient Greece, and philosophers have been puzzling over it ever since. It's even said that the gravestone of scholar Philetas of Cos, from the third century B.C.E., is engraved with the words "'Twas the Liar who made me die, And the bad nights caused thereby."