Your Stomach Growls All Day, It's Just Louder When You're Hungry

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Your Stomach Growls All Day, It's Just Louder When You're Hungry

We all know our stomach growls when it's empty. But did you know it also growls when it's full? The muscle contractions that cause that growling are happening all the time—the noise is just louder on an empty stomach.

It's Impossible To Stop Morning Breath

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It's Impossible To Stop Morning Breath

Everyone gets morning breath. Unfortunately, there's really nothing you can do about it. During the day, your mouth produces saliva to get rid of bacteria. At night, however, saliva production takes a break, so the bacteria that cause bad breath aren't washed away in the same way they are during waking hours. As a result, there's no avoid morning breath altogether. Brushing your teeth and drinking water before bed may help reduce the potency of the stench, but can't stave it off entirely. Factors that could make your morning breath worse include drinking coffee or alcohol before bed and sleeping with your mouth open, which only dries your mouth out more. To learn more about why your breath might stink (sorry, but it's true) watch the videos below.

02:58

from Nick Uhas

Key Facts to Know

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    While we're asleep, our saliva production slows down, preventing bacteria from getting washed away and causing "morning breath." 1:15

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    Brushing your teeth and drinking water before bed will help reduce morning breath. 1:49

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    There is nothing you can do to absolutely prevent morning breath. 2:03

Here's Why You Never Hear About Heart Cancer

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Here's Why You Never Hear About Heart Cancer

You've heard of brain cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer...the list goes on. If it exists in the human body, it can get cancer. Why, then, do you never hear about someone getting heart cancer? Heart cancer is rare, but not impossible. It happens so infrequently that the American Cancer Society doesn't even list it as its own cancer in their annual statistics—it's under the umbrella of "soft tissue" cancers, which had 12,310 cases in 2016. Compare that to breast cancer, which reached nearly 300,000 cases. The Mayo Clinic reports seeing only one case of heart cancer per year.

It Is Impossible For A Human To Be Double-Jointed

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It Is Impossible For A Human To Be Double-Jointed

Even if you've never claimed to be double-jointed, you've definitely heard someone else brag about it. But we've got news for those people proudly cranking their thumbs backwards to touch their forearms: there's no such thing as being double-jointed. The idea that some people have two joints in certain places on their bodies that increase flexibility is not only virtually impossible, but it actually sounds kind of silly, if you think about it...

We're Too Self-Aware To Tickle Ourselves

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We're Too Self-Aware To Tickle Ourselves

Have you ever noticed that certain areas of your body are more ticklish than others? If someone tickles your shoulder, you might not feel a thing, but have them tickle your armpits or the soles of your feet and you're sure to squirm. That's because these body parts are packed with nerve endings, the fibers of the nervous system that perceive outside information and send it up to the brain.According to Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, a neuroscientist at University College London, different parts of the brain activate if someone else is tickling you than if you're tickling yourself. When someone else tickles you and you start to laugh—a phenomenon known as "gargalesis"—both the touch and emotion and reward centers of the brain are activated. Some scientists think that this laughter may be a "false alarm" response. Our brains detect the startling contact as a potential threat, and then we laugh to signal to others that there isn't any danger after all.