Worried About Getting The Flu? Your Risk Is Tied To The Year You Were Born

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Worried About Getting The Flu? Your Risk Is Tied To The Year You Were Born

We have good news, and we have bad news. The good news is that the particular flu you were exposed to as a child probably gives you protection from several flu strains as an adult. The bad news is that it doesn't protect against all the others, and this makes it really hard to make a universal flu vaccine.

The Array Of Things Is A Fitness Tracker For Your City

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The Array Of Things Is A Fitness Tracker For Your City

What's the air quality like in your city? Chances are good that lots of different people are asking that question at this very moment, from city officials and hospital managers to environmental activists and parents of kids with asthma. Each of those people might answer the question on their own with the tools they have available. But what if one resource answered the question for all of them? Even better, what if it answered the question for each block in the city? That's what the Array of Things (AoT) project hopes to do.

AIDS-Related Deaths Are On A Steep Decline

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AIDS-Related Deaths Are On A Steep Decline

It was 1981 when physicians began reporting that gay men were suffering from rare illnesses usually seen only in people with severely weakened immune systems. The mysterious condition that caused it was called acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, and experts soon realized that it could affect anyone, regardless of gender or sexual orientation. It rapidly became an epidemic. At its peak, AIDS was responsible for 50,876 annual deaths in the United States. That was in 1995. A lot has changed since then. Antiretroviral drugs have been developed to fight AIDS by suppressing its associated virus, HIV. These drugs not only make it possible for people with HIV to live just as long as someone who's not infected, but they've even been shown to keep HIV from spreading to others. A 2011 study found that HIV-infected but otherwise healthy people who take antiretrovirals can limit their transmission of the virus by 96 percent, and a 2010 study found that even uninfected men can take the drugs preventatively to reduce their risk of infection.

The No One Dies Alone Program Pairs Volunteers With Terminal Patients

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The No One Dies Alone Program Pairs Volunteers With Terminal Patients

The fear of dying alone might plague humanity more than the fear of death itself. If you've ever had to visit a terminally ill loved one in the hospital, you've felt the importance of being with them in their final hours. But what about the patients who don't have anyone with whom to share their final moments? A nurse at Sacred Heart Medical Center in Eugene, Oregon, found the answer.In 1986, Sandra Clarke was working as a staff nurse at Sacred Heart when a frail, elderly man asked if she would stay with him. It was the end of Clarke's shift and she still had six more patients to check on, so she said she'd return later. When Clarke returned, the man had died, and he'd been alone when it happened. That's when Clarke vowed she would never have another patient die without someone by their side. Fifteen years later, the volunteer program No One Dies Alone (NODA) was born.

Usain Bolt Has Never Run A Mile. It Sounds Crazy, But It's Really Just Science

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Usain Bolt Has Never Run A Mile. It Sounds Crazy, But It's Really Just Science

In August of 2016, the New Yorker speculated how fast the legendary Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt might run a mile. The nine-paragraph article included interviews with running experts and comparisons to other record holders, which might seem like a lot of work when you could just ask Bolt himself. Except you can't: Usain Bolt has never run a mile.