Beauty Parlor Stroke Syndrome Can Be Caused By A Simple Hair Wash

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Beauty Parlor Stroke Syndrome Can Be Caused By A Simple Hair Wash

Having your hair washed professionally can be a luxurious treat—the best part of getting your haircut, even. Who doesn't like a great head and neck massage? But when your stylist forgets to prop your head up with a towel or two, it can be painful. Your neck falls backwards and the sink digs into your skin. Ouch. As it turns out, this position isn't only uncomfortable, it can also prove dangerous.As Peter Gloviczki, M.D., a vascular surgeon at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, told Self, "beauty parlor stroke syndrome is caused when there is an injury, tear, or blood clot in one of the four major arteries that go to the brain." If your neck isn't properly supported while your stylist shampoos your hair, it can be hyperextended, and that can compress one of those four major arteries. According to Gloviczki, a tear in the blood vessel could result "in a blood clot, which can travel to your brain and cause a stroke." This syndrome, officially called iatrogenic vertebral artery injury, is rare, but it has happened.

Scientists Are Only Just Beginning To Discover What Causes Gray Hair

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Scientists Are Only Just Beginning To Discover What Causes Gray Hair

Gray hair is the tell-tale sign of aging. But it wasn't until March of 2016 that scientists discovered a gene that plays a role in the hair graying process. As Dr. Kaustubh Adhikari, the lead author of the study that outlines this discovery, explained: "We already know several genes involved in balding and hair color but this is the first time a gene for graying has been identified in humans, as well as other genes influencing hair shape and density." Thanks to this study, we now have strong evidence to suggest that genetics—specifically a gene called IRF4—play a role in graying hair, not just environmental factors like stress or smoking. The logical next step? Developing products to delay the graying process. Watch the video below for more details on this gray hair gene study.

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Key Facts to Know

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    What drives the process of aging from a cellular perspective is still largely a mystery. 0:27

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    After age 30, your chances of dying double every eight years. 1:37

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    Caloric restriction has been observed to extend the lifespan of rodents by up 50%. 2:55

Laser Hair Removal Really Turns Up The Heat

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Laser Hair Removal Really Turns Up The Heat

Since its arrival in the 1990s, laser hair removal has become one of the most popular cosmetic procedures in the world. It targets specific areas of a person's body with laser pulses, the energy of which is absorbed by the melanin molecules in hairs. This essentially overheats and damages the cells in the hair's follicle, preventing it from regrowing. The laser light has to be of an optimal wavelength to prevent its absorption by other molecules in the surrounding skin, which could cause burns.

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from Veritasium

Key Facts to Know

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    Lasers used for hair removal deliver precise pulses in a matter of milliseconds. 1:18

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    Laser hair removal relies on the dark melanin in hairs to absorb laser light. 3:15

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    During a laser hair removal session, laser energy damages the cells inside hair follicles to prevent future hair growth. 4:49

What's Up With Poodle Haircuts?

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What's Up With Poodle Haircuts?

The elaborate haircut of the poodle you're likely familiar with originated in the late 16th century. This fancy haircut helped the dogs retrieve wild game hunted near the water. Their bottom halves were shaved to improve buoyancy, the chest and joints were warmed by unshaved hair, and a bare face kept hair out of the eyes and mouth of the dogs.

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from Vsauce2

Key Facts to Know

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    The poodle haircut was created to help them retrieve wild game near water. 0:06

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    Research shows that dogs respond to how we say something, versus what we actually say. 0:58

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    Dogs see in color—the thought that they are colorblind is a myth. 1:27

Do Your Hair And Fingernails Keep Growing After You Die?

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Do Your Hair And Fingernails Keep Growing After You Die?

After death, a body slowly loses moisture, causing the skin to dry and pull away from nails and hair. This process exposes the previously hidden nail beds and hair shafts, and makes it look as though the corpse's nails and hair have grown. Funeral homes offset this process by administering moisturizer to the dead.

02:32

from geobeats

Key Facts to Know

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    After death, the human body becomes dehydrated, which causes the skin to retract around the hair and nails. 0:21

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    Gut bacteria keep breaking down food even after their host body has died. 1:19

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    Even after the heart and lungs stop working, the brain can continue to pull nutrients and oxygen from the body. 1:56