Thermostat Temperatures Were Designed For Men

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Thermostat Temperatures Were Designed For Men

In many homes and offices, men and women are in a constant battle over the thermostat. A 2015 paper published in the journal Nature Climate Change pointed out the reason why: the model that defined the standard thermostat temperature of 71º F (22º C) was designed in the 1960s and based on the metabolic rate of a 154 lb (70 kg), 40-year-old man. This underestimates women's metabolic rate by up to 35%, which could explain why women prefer a temperature quite a bit higher: 77º F (25º C), according to one study. The authors of the Nature paper point out that if standards were to take more genders, ages, and body types into account, the benefits would go far beyond making people comfortable. We could save energy and reduce carbon emissions, too. Explore thermostat science with the videos below.

Men Eat More When They're With Women

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Men Eat More When They're With Women

For a 2015 study, researchers from the Cornell Food and Brand Lab camped out at an Italian buffet to watch people eat. They recorded how many pizza slices and bowls of salad each diner consumed, then had them complete a short survey before leaving. What they found was striking: men who dined with at least one woman ate 92% more pizza and 86% more salad than men dining with just men. (Interestingly, even though women ate the same regardless of who they dined with, those in the company of men thought they overate). Scientists think men overeat in the company of women in an attempt to show off. This isn't the first time scientists have seen a mixed-gender environment change people's behavior. In 2009, a Cornell study found that groups of men and women will make riskier financial decisions than groups of one gender. The take-home message? Make sure you're eating to satisfy your appetite, not to impress the opposite sex.

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Key Facts to Know

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    A Cornell University study found that men eat more food when they're around women. 0:13

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    Scientists think that this is all about competition. By eating more, men prove they possess extraordinary skills in comparison to other men. 0:36

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    Men take more hazardous risks than women, and though overeating is a less risky behavior than some, researchers consider it risky nonetheless. 0:51

What Would A Post-Gender World Look Like?

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What Would A Post-Gender World Look Like?

Are you a boy or a girl? You probably started answering the question of your gender at a young age, and that identity might be a concept that is so ingrained in you that you've never given it a second thought. So what is gender, really? It's not the same as your biological sex. Gender can be defined as a way to describe ourselves to others. But if it's main purpose is to act as a tool to help other people establish a preconceived notion of who we are, then is it really important, or even necessary?

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Key Facts to Know

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    Hatshepsut was a queen of ancient Egypt, but she made all the carvers carve her statues as male. 2:18

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    With assisted reproduction, babies could be born from same-sex couples and a single fetus from three parents. 3:59

The Mexican Third Gender Muxe Of Oaxaca

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The Mexican Third Gender Muxe Of Oaxaca

A muxe is a male at birth who dresses and behaves in ways consistent with the female gender. The muxe was born countless generations ago in the small Mexican town of Juchitán de Zaragoza in Oaxaca, where they are revered and celebrated. Interestingly, the muxe contradicts the typical machismo culture of Mexico. The muxe take on traditionally feminine roles in the community, specifically caring for elders after their sons and daughters began having families of their own. The muxe term has begun to catch on in other parts of the world to mean anyone who does not identify with gendered norms.

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Key Facts to Know

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    The small Mexican town of Juchitán de Zaragoza celebrates a third gender: the Muxe. 0:19

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    The muxe are responsible for caring for elders in the community after sons and daughters have families of their own. 0:55

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    The term "muxe" is being adopted by people in L.A. who exist outside the gender norms. 1:56

Men and Women See The World Differently

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Men and Women See The World Differently

It's easy to say that men and women don't see eye to eye on certain things — but it turns out that when it comes to vision, that truly is the case. For example, one study showed that women could differentiate between similar hues that looked identical to men, particularly those in the yellow and green range. Men, however, were more adept at pinpointing when light or dark barks flickered on a screen. Scientists aren't sure why these differences exist, though some believe that the increased amount of testosterone in the visual regions of men's brains may be the cause. Others think that the difference could be cultural, not hardwired. Learn more about color, and how we see it, below.

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from geobeats

Key Facts to Know

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    Multiple surveys have shown that blue is the most popular response to "What is your favorite color?". 0:29

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    Bulls aren't actually angered by the color red. 1:08

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    School buses are yellow because it is the most attention-grabbing color when seen in our peripheral vision. 1:55