The Ancient Practice Of Golden Eagle Hunting Is Making A Comeback

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The Ancient Practice Of Golden Eagle Hunting Is Making A Comeback

What would it take for you to trap a golden eagle? Imagine pursuing a 3-foot, 15-pound bird with a wingspan of over 6 feet that reaches speeds of up to 190 miles per hour. Think you can handle that? Just be sure to steer clear of their razor sharp, bone-breaking talons. If you're starting to wonder who in their right minds would hunt such an intimidating animal, say hello to golden eagle hunters, the bürkitshiler. They're named after the Kazakh word for eagle, "bürkit," and have been hunting these birds for centuries.

America's Film History Is Stored In a Cold War Bunker

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America's Film History Is Stored In a Cold War Bunker

The U.S. Library of Congress in Washington D.C. is home to more than 160 million books, recordings, photos, manuscripts, and other important pieces of American cultural history. But not everything is kept within those walls. 75 miles to the southwest near the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains is the Packard Campus of the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center, a 415,000 square-foot (38,555 square-meter) facility that houses 140,000 reels of film. Those reels include classics such as Casablanca, flops such as Gigli, and even nitrate film—an old medium that's kept in its own vaults because it's highly flammable. In fact, all of the center's 6.3 million collection items are well protected, since the Packard Campus was once a nuclear bunker.

Geometry Helps You Love And Hate Movie Characters

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Geometry Helps You Love And Hate Movie Characters

Plenty of people don't love math. But math is one important reason people love certain characters in movies. The geometry of cinematography is something filmmakers carefully consider in order to manipulate viewers' emotions. Yes, the secret weapon of movies is math! Put simply: friendly characters are round and soft, while evil characters are sharp and hard. Think about Mickey Mouse versus Darth Vader. There you have it.

Rewatching Your Favorite Movies Is Good For You

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Rewatching Your Favorite Movies Is Good For You

How many times have you seen your favorite movie? If the mere-exposure effect holds up, you've likely watched it many times. This phenomenon is the tendency to like things more as you become more familiar with them, but only to a certain point. What drives us to rewatch movies, put songs we already know on repeat, or reread a good book? One reason is because, well, we like the movies, songs, and books we're re-consuming. But another reason is that we gain emotional comfort from these repeated viewings (or listenings, or readings). According to a 2012 study by Cristel Antonia Russell and Sidney Levy published in the Journal of Consumer Research, rewatching our favorite movies is satisfyingly easy for our brains to process, which makes the experience calming. And because we already know the outcome, the predictability makes us feel safe in what can seem like an unpredictably scary world. The study also explains that people reconsume for a sense of nostalgia, which can be comforting to the point of actually making a person feel warm. Learn more about the mere-exposure effect in the video below.

Actress Grace Kelly

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Actress Grace Kelly

"The freedom of the press works in such a way that there is not much freedom from it," once said Grace Kelly, born November 12, 1929. The iconic actress left the film industry in 1956 to marry Prince Rainier, and became Princess Grace of Monaco. Watch a short bio video of Kelly.

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from BIO

Key Facts to Know

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    Grace Kelly came from an affluent background and was very intelligent. 0:35

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    Kelly had an affair with co-star and Hollywood legend Clark Gable. 1:07

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    Grace Kelly was once one of the highest paid actresses in the world. 1:50