Martin Greenfield Survived The Holocaust, And Now Dresses The U.S. President

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Martin Greenfield Survived The Holocaust, And Now Dresses The U.S. President

Martin Greenfield is considered one of of the best—if not the best—men's suits tailors in the United States. And what's even more impressive? He began learning his craft as a way to save his life. Greenfield is Jewish, and he was deported to the Auschwitz concentration camp in 1942. When asked if he had any special skills, he said that he could learn to sew if taught a few stitches. Greenfield learned his sewing skills in the camp, and as a 14-year-old boy, quickly became an asset to those in charge. In 1945 when Greenfield was 17 years old, Auschwitz was liberated. At the time, the Eisenhower was President of the U.S. Soon after the liberation, President Eisenhower became the first of many presidents Greenfield dressed.

The Surprising Ways Caffeine Shows Up In Cosmetic Products

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The Surprising Ways Caffeine Shows Up In Cosmetic Products

Caffeine isn't just for coffee and soda. There's probably caffeine in the beauty products you have lying around your house right now. For example, many cellulite creams contain caffeine, because some people believe it can reduce the appearance of cellulite dimpling on a cellular level. It's also in shampoos and hair products to stimulate hair growth through inhibition of the 5-α-reductase activity. When used in sunscreen lotions, caffeine can even boost the SPF power by protecting cells against UV radiation and slowing down the photoaging process of the skin. We've collected some awesome videos on this topic. Watch them now to learn more.

The Explosive Origins of the Bikini

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The Explosive Origins of the Bikini

Today, it might seem in poor taste for a clothing designer to name his creation after a center of nuclear destruction. But back when the modern bikini was created, it was actually quite common to get inspiration from the trendy new world of nuclear physics. For example, another (only slightly larger) two-piece swimsuit unveiled at the same time was dubbed the "Atome" (leading to jokes about how the tiny bikini split the atom). And while designer Louis Réard's predictions that the swimsuit would shock the fashion world did come true -- countries with religious traditions threatened to withdraw from the 1952 Miss World contest when the first winner was crowned in a bikini, and the Pope even condemned the crowning as "sinful" -- his creation wasn't the first revealing two-piece women ever wore. In the 3rd-century Villa Romana Del Casale in Rome, a mosaic shows women wearing garments that look startlingly like modern bandeau-style bathing suits while they exercise.

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Key Facts to Know

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    The inventor of the modern bikini wanted the swimsuit to make a big impact like the atomic bomb, so he named it after Bikini Atoll, where the US tested nuclear bombs. 0:05

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    Before Queen Victoria's wedding, white was traditionally worn for mourning. 0:26

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    Former New York City mayor Fiornello LaGuardia ordered nude dancers to show less skin, leading to the advent of the thong. 1:23

Would You Get A Tattoo With Cremated Ashes?!

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Would You Get A Tattoo With Cremated Ashes?!

Have you ever considered getting a tattoo dedicated to the remembrance of a deceased loved one? This process takes that concept to the extreme. It's called commemorative tattooing, and is basically getting inked with a mixture that includes tattoo ink and the cremated ashes of deceased loved ones. The practice is not new, but it has been gaining popularity in recent years. It is mainly done more "underground," as there are unseen health risks cited by many professional tattoo parlours.

Plague Doctors Dressed Like Spooky Birds

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Plague Doctors Dressed Like Spooky Birds

You may have seen these beaked plague-doctor masks on Halloween, or at cosplay conventions. But why the beak? Back in the 17th century, doctors still believed in the miasma theory of disease, which hypothesized that disease spread through a rotten-smelling scent or vapor. The beaks of the masks were meant to be stuffed with herbs, dried flowers, and other perfumed substances, thereby protecting the doctor from the "infectious" air.

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from SciShow

Key Facts to Know

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    In the 19th century, many people wore garments or shoes colored with aniline dyes, which often poisoned their blood. 1:59

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    The phrase "mad as a hatter" refers to industrial hat-makers in the mid 1800s, who were poisoned by mercury while producing their hats. 4:44

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    During the heyday of celluloid accessories, combs and other items would suddenly catch fire when placed near a heat source. 8:19