Nanofarm Is The First Appliance That Will Grow Produce For You

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Nanofarm Is The First Appliance That Will Grow Produce For You

Gardening is a lot of work. Farming, perhaps even more so. But Replantable has come up with a product that takes all the work out of growing your own produce. Nanofarm is a food-growing appliance that claims to make growing your own produce easier and more convenient than it has ever been. It's hard to deny that claim—all you have to do is water it, press a button, and wait until the device tells you your produce is ready to harvest. Boom! Your salad is waiting.

This Huge Indoor Vertical Farm Represents The Future Of Farming

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This Huge Indoor Vertical Farm Represents The Future Of Farming

A facility in the works in Newark, New Jersey has been called an "agriculture revolution." Developed by AeroFarms, the 70,000-square-foot facility will become the world's largest indoor, vertical farm. This facility will use 95% less water than traditional field farming, with yields 75 times higher per square foot annually. Zero pesticides, herbicides, and fungicides will be used at the facility, and it will grow crops indoors using a technique called aeroponics, where the plants grow in mist. This method of farming uses 40% less water than hydroponics. It's a fruitful plan too: each AeroFarms facility can grow 22 crops per year. It would take field farms a full three years to grow that many crops.

Hundreds Of Ducks Are Employees at a Vineyard

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Hundreds Of Ducks Are Employees at a Vineyard

At 9:45 every morning at the Vergenoegd Wine Estate in Stellenbosch, South Africa, a giant herd of ducks is released. About 700-800 Indian Runner ducks are employed at the vineyard, and their job is simple: keep the grapevines free of pests. These ducks are released in mass, running across the vineyard's grounds in formation to eat up slugs and snails all day. Luckily for visitors to the vineyard, they can watch the delightful parade of ducks twice a day.

What Happened To The Gros Michel Banana?

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What Happened To The Gros Michel Banana?

The Gros Michel banana, also called the "Big Mike" banana, was the dominant banana variety exported and eaten in the United States until around 1960. When a fungus called Panama Disease infiltrated banana plantations, it nearly wiped out the Gros Michel banana entirely. Growers had to resort to the Cavendish banana to save the industry, despite the fact that this longer cultivar was thought to be less tasty and more prone to bruising. Today, we enjoy Cavendish bananas pretty much exclusively, though they too are in danger of being decimated by fungus.

04:06

from SciShow

Key Facts to Know

  • 1

    There are dozens of species and thousands of varieties of bananas that humans don't eat. 0:54

  • 2

    Cavendish bananas are all genetically almost identical. 1:32

  • 3

    After the Gros Michel banana almost went extinct, the entire banana industry had to be re-tooled around the Cavendish banana. 2:11

Can Water Witching Help Farmers Find Water?

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Can Water Witching Help Farmers Find Water?

In the grips of the California drought, winemakers are doing anything they can to locate water to continue producing wine. One option is dowsing or "water witching"-a practice which uses divining or dowsing rods to find water underground. Practitioners claim the rods locate unseen water using energy from the practitioner's body. Winemaker Marc Mondavi is a third generation winemaker and water witcher who has been sought after by vineyard owners and farmers for help during California's record drought. Mondavi preaches the power of water witching even though he admits the lack of science behind it.