Are Aliens Secretly Studying Life On Earth From Afar? The Zoo Hypothesis Says Yes

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Are Aliens Secretly Studying Life On Earth From Afar? The Zoo Hypothesis Says Yes

As far as we know, we earthlings have never made contact with extraterrestrials. (Right, conspiracy theorists?) 20th-century physicist Enrico Fermi thought that was a bit odd, considering the overwhelming likelihood that alien life exists. In 1950, his "where are all the aliens?" question became known as the Fermi paradox. Think about it: what are the chances that life on Earth is the only life in the impossibly gigantic universe? There are probably 100 Earth-like planets for every grain of sand in the world... yet we've never encountered a life form not born of this planet. What's the deal?

BRIXO Blocks Take Fun With Legos To A Smart New Level

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BRIXO Blocks Take Fun With Legos To A Smart New Level

Playing with toy blocks seems childish, right? Not so fast. BRIXO blocks are like Legos on steroids, and they've got a lot to teach kids and adults alike. These blocks are coated in chrome and conduct electricity, which means they can add light, motion, or sound to any building block creation. They're perfectly compatible with Legos, so adding just a few BRIXO blocks to your Lego castle can give it new life. And since they are basically robotic instruments, BRIXO blocks make it socially acceptable for adults to play with blocks.

Universe 25 Began As A Mice Paradise, But Ended As A Nightmare

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Universe 25 Began As A Mice Paradise, But Ended As A Nightmare

John B. Calhoun did not set out to make a giant hellhole for mice, but that's basically what he did in 1972. Universe 25 was Calhoun's twenty-fifth experimental rodent enclosure. In it, Calhoun included everything a mouse might need or want: food, water, a temperature-controlled environment, cozy mouse "apartments," and more. However, Calhoun knew Universe 25 wasn't going to stay a rodent paradise; all of his other mouse complexes went awry. But Universe 25 was the biggest failure yet. Calhoun introduced eight white mice, four male and four female, to the environment. Just two years later, the increased mouse population essentially created its own apocalypse. The complex was crowded during its peak population. The mice got violent with each other, and mother mice even forgot about some of their babies. Calhoun called a particular group of mice "the beautiful ones," because they had separated themselves from the chaos, avoiding violence and death. However, these mice had no desire for social connections. They stopped mating and caring for their young. Watch the video below to learn how this disturbing experiment could relate to human life.

Could We All Be Living In A Computer Simulation?

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Could We All Be Living In A Computer Simulation?

In 2003, philosopher Nick Bostrom proposed the simulation hypothesis, which officially put forth the idea that our universe might be a computer simulation. Both scientists and Hollywood directors have since addressed this notion and its variants, but few people have suggested feasible tests for proving or disproving it. In 2012, a team at the University of Washington said that looking for a limitation in the energy of cosmic rays might be indicative of a simulation's "signature." Others have said that unexplained physics phenomena might be "glitches" in the simulation, which could never be a perfect copy of a real universe. Building a simulation ourselves would help us to determine what these glitches look like, and subsequently search for them in our own universe. However, the technology needed for simulating a universe (inside our own, which may or may not be a simulation itself) is not yet available.

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from DNews

Key Facts to Know

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    The idea of our reality being an illusion is as old as Buddhist and Hindu philosophy. 0:24

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    Scientists at the University of Washington have proposed running tests to determine whether our universe is a simulation. 1:00

  • 3

    Some people believe that unexplainable phenomena in physics could indicate "glitches," and provide proof that our universe is a simulation. 2:12

The Pitch Drop Experiment Has Been Going On For More Than 85 Years

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The Pitch Drop Experiment Has Been Going On For More Than 85 Years

In 1927, Professor Thomas Parnell thought up a way to demonstrate the counterintuitive properties of certain materials. He set up a funnel of pitch, and let it set for three years before placing it over a jar. The pitch appears solid, but is actually an incredibly viscous liquid, and from 1930 until today, it has been slowly but steadily dripping into the container below. As of 2016, nine drops have fallen from the funnel, with each one taking around 8 to 13 years to separate completely. Scientists have estimated that the pitch is about 100 billion times more viscous than water.