The Array Of Things Is A Fitness Tracker For Your City

1 of 12

The Array Of Things Is A Fitness Tracker For Your City

What's the air quality like in your city? Chances are good that lots of different people are asking that question at this very moment, from city officials and hospital managers to environmental activists and parents of kids with asthma. Each of those people might answer the question on their own with the tools they have available. But what if one resource answered the question for all of them? Even better, what if it answered the question for each block in the city? That's what the Array of Things (AoT) project hopes to do.

Usain Bolt Has Never Run A Mile. It Sounds Crazy, But It's Really Just Science

2 of 12

Usain Bolt Has Never Run A Mile. It Sounds Crazy, But It's Really Just Science

In August of 2016, the New Yorker speculated how fast the legendary Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt might run a mile. The nine-paragraph article included interviews with running experts and comparisons to other record holders, which might seem like a lot of work when you could just ask Bolt himself. Except you can't: Usain Bolt has never run a mile.

In Your Lifetime, You'll Walk The Equivalent Of 5 Equators

3 of 12

In Your Lifetime, You'll Walk The Equivalent Of 5 Equators

It goes without saying that staying active is crucial in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. But where will that commitment get you? Five times around the Earth's equator. Well, not literally. A moderately active person will walk the equivalent of about five lengths of the equator during their lifetime if they live to the age of 80. That's a lot of walking—and that's a really, really good thing.

Side Stitches May Be Caused By An Organ You've Never Heard Of

4 of 12

Side Stitches May Be Caused By An Organ You've Never Heard Of

What causes that cramp in your side during exercise? It turns out that scientists don't actually know. There have long been two prevailing theories. The first is that it comes from a cramp in your diaphragm, the muscle that enables your lungs to fill with air. This may seem likely on its face, but it doesn't hold up when you think about the fact that side aches are a common ailment of horseback riders, who aren't breathing heavily when it happens. The second theory is that the pain comes from a jostling of your organs during excessive movement. This doesn't really hold up either, as anyone who has had a side stitch can tell you it's in a single area, not all over.

02:44

from SciShow

Key Facts to Know

  • 1

    A stitch is known as a exercise related transient abdominal pain. 0:26

  • 2

    When exercising, you may become dehydrated, which means there is less fluid in between the layers of the peritoneum, resulting in pain. 1:37

  • 3

    Working out to strengthen your core should reduce movement in your abdomen while exercising. 2:02

After Exercise, Women Aren't As Sore As Men

5 of 12

After Exercise, Women Aren't As Sore As Men

Women don't often have an advantage over men when it comes to strength. But according to science, they have a leg up on the day after a hard workout: women don't experience as much post-exercise soreness as men do. Delayed-onset muscle soreness, or DOMS, is the pain and stiffness that starts 6–12 hours and peaks 24–36 hours after exercise. It's especially common after workouts that involve what are known as "eccentric contractions," where a muscle is both flexing and lengthening, as in the lowering phase of a bicep curl. Though a common misconception about DOMS is that it's caused by a buildup of lactic acid, modern science recognizes that the pain probably stems from inflammation and other reactions to microtears in the muscle tissue.It's there that scientists think women, with their abundance of estrogen, have the advantage. Animal studies point to a difference in those microtears: male rats show more muscle damage than female rats after eccentric contractions, for example. But studies of humans show something further down the chain. A study in the Journal of Applied Physiology found that men and women experienced the same amount of muscle damage, but men's muscles had more inflammation post-exercise. Though more study is needed to learn exactly why women feel less pain from their gain, it could explain why they have an advantage over men in intense endurance events like ultramarathons. Learn more about the science of exercise with the videos below.