The "Great Smog" Was A Killer Fog That Blanketed London For Five Days

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The "Great Smog" Was A Killer Fog That Blanketed London For Five Days

The morning of Dec. 5, 1952, a light veil of fog surrounded London—what else is new? However, an unusually chilly night had caused Londoners to crank up their coal stoves. As the day crept on, the skies grew dark with soot and the fog turned into an ominous yellow cloud of smog.Related: The Cement On This Italian Building Actually Eats Smog

Idling Your Car In The Winter Isn't Necessary

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Idling Your Car In The Winter Isn't Necessary

If you've ever borrowed your brother's car on a cold winter day, he might've sternly requested for you to let the car engine idle for at least five minutes before driving to school. (Not that we have any experience with that...) But is this advice valid? Nope—not anymore.

Radioactive Waste Can Power Long-Lasting Diamond Batteries

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Radioactive Waste Can Power Long-Lasting Diamond Batteries

A team of physicists and chemists from the University of Bristol have created a manmade diamond with electric currents that last longer than the history of human civilization. If you think that's impressive, listen to this: these super diamonds are powered by our nuclear waste.

LuminAID Lanterns Are Solving The Natural Disaster Problem You Didn't Even Know Was A Problem

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LuminAID Lanterns Are Solving The Natural Disaster Problem You Didn't Even Know Was A Problem

When natural disasters strike, there are countless needs that require attention. Medical emergencies, of course, but infrastructural ones too, like clean water, warm blankets, and safe shelter. One vital need that isn't often considered? Light. Enter LuminAID. These solar-powered, durable and sustainable lanterns (which were featured on a 2015 episode of Shark Tank and got an investment from Mark Cuban) have provided light in the wake of disasters like Hurricane Sandy, Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, and the 2015 earthquakes in Nepal.

Coal Ash Is More Radioactive Than Nuclear Waste

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Coal Ash Is More Radioactive Than Nuclear Waste

The energy debate is a heated one. Every potential source of energy seems to have both pros and cons, and it can be hard to keep it all straight. In general, plenty of people think that coal is the bad guy for the environment: it produces dirty air and is non-renewable. On the other hand, some people think nuclear power is the worst culprit. The scary thought about nuclear energy is that it's so, so dangerously radioactive. Right? Well, no. This fact turns the tables a bit: The waste produced by coal power plants is more radioactive than nuclear waste. Who would have thought?