The Creeping Feeling That People Are Out To Help You? That's Pronoia

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The Creeping Feeling That People Are Out To Help You? That's Pronoia

We've all been paranoid at some point or another. But have you ever been pronoid? Pronoia is the sneaking suspicion that everyone around you is plotting your success. Sounds kind of lovely, right? Just because it's the opposite of paranoia doesn't mean it's particularly ideal...Related: You've Probably Felt These Very Specific Emotions, But Never Knew Their Names

Scientists Turn To The Champ To Make People Cry

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Scientists Turn To The Champ To Make People Cry

What's the world's saddest movie scene? Don't worry about it, science has you covered. In thousands of psychology studies, researchers rely on the final scene of the 1979 film "The Champ" as a tried-and-true way to turn on the waterworks.

Revenge Really Does Make You Feel Better

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Revenge Really Does Make You Feel Better

When you've been rejected, the idea of "sweet" revenge might actually have a grounding in science. But is retaliation a healthy long-term solution? Related: Jealousy Could Be Good For Your Relationship

The Maternal Bereavement Effect Explains Why Parents Die From Grief

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The Maternal Bereavement Effect Explains Why Parents Die From Grief

The December 2016 death of actress Carrie Fisher, followed a day later by her mother, the iconic Debbie Reynolds, became a tragic Hollywood example of the maternal bereavement effect. A 2013 study found that a mother's mortality rate increases dramatically after the loss of a child. Related: The Surprising Ways Stress Affects Your Body

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from Brit Lab

Key Facts to Know

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    The brain activity and surge of dopamine you experience when in love are similar to the ones you experience when hooked on nicotine or cocaine. 1:05

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    The brain reacts to rejection and heartbreak in some of the same ways as it does to physical pain. 2:26

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    Your chances of having a heart attack increase by 6 times during the first week of bereavement. 3:54

The Five Stages Of Grief Is a Myth

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The Five Stages Of Grief Is a Myth

Denial, anger, bargaining, depression, acceptance. Those are the stages you're supposed to go through when you're grieving. But if you've ever mourned the death of a loved one, you probably noticed that your emotions didn't follow that neat and tidy path. That's because they don't: the idea that there are five stages of grief is a big fat myth.Related: The Greyson Scale Quantifies Near-Death Experiences