Last Time Earth Was At This Spot in the Galaxy, Dinosaurs Existed

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Last Time Earth Was At This Spot in the Galaxy, Dinosaurs Existed

You're always moving because the earth is always rotating. It's also revolving around the sun, making a complete orbit once a year. Our sun, likewise, revolves around the Milky Way galaxy, taking our entire solar system with it. It takes the sun approximately 225-250 million years to make a full trip around the galaxy, a period known as a "cosmic year." This means that at any given moment, our planet is in roughly the same spot in the Milky Way it was 250 million years ago. Today, that point in history coincides with the Permian-Triassic extinction, the most catastrophic of our planet's five mass extinction events, when 90% of marine species and 70% of land species died out. After the extensive decimation, the Triassic period began, bringing with it Archosaurs, early grasshoppers, and eventually the first mammals, all of which lived on the supercontinent known as Pangaea. In another 250 million years, we'll arrive back at this spot in the Milky Way. Find out more about the movement of the universe in these videos.

05:08

from DNews

Key Facts to Know

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    As the Earth rotates, the Equator moves the fastest while the poles move the slowest. 1:06

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    The Milky Way Galaxy is headed toward the Andromeda Galaxy at approximately 405,500 kph (252,000 mph). 2:40

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    Here's a breakdown of humanity's celestial speed: 3:58

The Stegosaurus Was An Ancient Relic To The T.Rex

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The Stegosaurus Was An Ancient Relic To The T.Rex

It's a common misconception to lump together all non-avian dinosaurs into a single time period. The truth is, dinosaurs roamed the Earth for a long time, and they all most certainly did not exist together. For example, the stegosaurus roamed the Earth during the late Jurassic period, between 156 and 144 million years ago. On the other hand, the Tyrannosaurus rex lived during the late Cretaceous period, about 67-65 million years ago. The T.rex actually existed closer in history to humans than to the stegosaurus.

Dinosaurs Didn't Sound Like You Think They Do

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Dinosaurs Didn't Sound Like You Think They Do

Who could forget the terrifying, eardrum-bursting roar of the T.rex in "Jurassic Park"? Though memorable, this movie representation is far from accurate. Scientists believe that dinosaurs probably did not roar, and may have not been able to make any noise at all. The noise may have been closer to the croaking of a crocodile, not a loud, booming roar. The voice boxes of birds and crocodiles, who share dinosaur ancestors, may have evolved independently. This would mean that the last common ancestor of birds and crocodilians might not have been able to vocalize in any way, meaning too that dinosaurs had no way of vocalizing.

04:15

from DNews

Key Facts to Know

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    "Jurassic Park" creators combined the sounds of a baby elephant, alligator, and tiger for the dinosaurs' roars. 0:00

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    Birds use an organ called the syrinx to make vocalizations. 1:36

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    Some dinosaurs had massive, resonating crests on top of their heads connected to their breathing tracts which amplified sounds. 2:31

Days Were Shorter For Dinosaurs

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Days Were Shorter For Dinosaurs

Every 100 years, the world slows down its rotation by 1.4 milliseconds due to the oceans. Days were only 23 hours long 20 million years ago, and were exactly 24 hours long in the year 1820. Today, the length of a day is about 24 hours and 2.5 milliseconds.

05:15

Key Facts to Know

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    Due to the oceans, the Earth's rotation is slowing down. 0:32

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    It is suggested that the Milky Way smells like raspberries and would taste like rum. 1:09

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    It is suggested that the smell of the cosmos would be that of seared steak, hot metal or arc welding fumes. 3:42

The Dinosaur That Looks Like A Tiny Bat-Dragon

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The Dinosaur That Looks Like A Tiny Bat-Dragon

Yi qi means "strange wing" in Mandarin. Scientists theorize that the small dinosaur was a failed experiment in flight, one that went extinct while feathery wings continued to evolve. They don't know exactly how it used its wings, but its anatomy suggests it was capable of gliding. (Image credit: Emily Willoughby)

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Key Facts to Know

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    There are three different known groups of flying vertebrates: birds, bats, and pterosaurs. 0:21

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    Yi qi had long fingers that supported a wing membrane, which may have resembled a bat's wing. 0:55

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    Scientists theorize that Yi qi was able to glide. 1:19