How Generative Design Creates From The Top Down

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How Generative Design Creates From The Top Down

Generative design uses computer algorithms to come up with a variety of designs based on the criteria you need, rather than what the object should look like.

Thinly Shaved Wood Makes Up Yosegi Wood Designs

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Thinly Shaved Wood Makes Up Yosegi Wood Designs

Patterns on the little wooden boxes made with yosegi techniques look like they could be painted on, but that's not the case. This Japanese technique uses thinly sliced pieces of wood to construct intricate and naturally colored designs.

Biomimicry Looks To Nature To Inspire Invention

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Biomimicry Looks To Nature To Inspire Invention

Instead of consuming nature's resources, the burgeoning field of biomimicry looks to the natural world for innovation inspiration, resulting in high-tech analogs of natural materials and designs.

Thomassons Are Functionally Useless Architectural Relics

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Thomassons Are Functionally Useless Architectural Relics

Stroll about your city, and you'll likely notice a few staircases leading to nowhere, doors opening to brick walls, or pipes filled with nothing at all. Why have these useless vestiges been saved—or even, in some cases, maintained? The architectural relics scattered throughout your town that are purposefully preserved despite being functionally useless are known as "Thomassons," and they have an interesting backstory.

How Alonzo Clemons Overcame A Brain Injury To Become A World-Class Sculptor

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How Alonzo Clemons Overcame A Brain Injury To Become A World-Class Sculptor

You've probably dabbled with Play-Doh as a kid. Most people's sculpting experience ends around there, but that wasn't the case for Alonzo Clemons. Severely disabled as a young child, Clemons could barely speak, nor could he feed himself or tie his own shoes. But his disability brought on one important gift—acquired savant syndrome, a condition where high-level, often prodigious skills appear after a brain injury. This gave Clemons an uncanny ability to create hyper-accurate sculptures of animals that started from a young age and only sharpened as he grew up. Today, he can simply glance at a horse on TV and, in just 20 minutes, sculpt a clay figure of that horse that is anatomically correct down to every muscle. Despite his still very limited vocabulary, Clemons has shown his work throughout the world. Hear Clemons speak about his work in the video below.