Celebrities Don't Really Die In Threes, And The New York Times Once Proved It

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Celebrities Don't Really Die In Threes, And The New York Times Once Proved It

Just a few days after a beloved musician died, you hear about the sudden passing of a movie star. Who's going to be next? These things always happen in threes—don't they? Although such a pattern might make the universe feel more predictable, it's unfortunately not the case. Celebrities do not die in threes.Related: The Maternal Bereavement Effect Explains Why Parents Die From Grief

The Maternal Bereavement Effect Explains Why Parents Die From Grief

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The Maternal Bereavement Effect Explains Why Parents Die From Grief

The December 2016 death of actress Carrie Fisher, followed a day later by her mother, the iconic Debbie Reynolds, became a tragic Hollywood example of the maternal bereavement effect. A 2013 study found that a mother's mortality rate increases dramatically after the loss of a child. Related: The Surprising Ways Stress Affects Your Body

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from Brit Lab

Key Facts to Know

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    The brain activity and surge of dopamine you experience when in love are similar to the ones you experience when hooked on nicotine or cocaine. 1:05

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    The brain reacts to rejection and heartbreak in some of the same ways as it does to physical pain. 2:26

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    Your chances of having a heart attack increase by 6 times during the first week of bereavement. 3:54

The No One Dies Alone Program Pairs Volunteers With Terminal Patients

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The No One Dies Alone Program Pairs Volunteers With Terminal Patients

The fear of dying alone might plague humanity more than the fear of death itself. If you've ever had to visit a terminally ill loved one in the hospital, you've felt the importance of being with them in their final hours. But what about the patients who don't have anyone with whom to share their final moments? A nurse at Sacred Heart Medical Center in Eugene, Oregon, found the answer.In 1986, Sandra Clarke was working as a staff nurse at Sacred Heart when a frail, elderly man asked if she would stay with him. It was the end of Clarke's shift and she still had six more patients to check on, so she said she'd return later. When Clarke returned, the man had died, and he'd been alone when it happened. That's when Clarke vowed she would never have another patient die without someone by their side. Fifteen years later, the volunteer program No One Dies Alone (NODA) was born.

The Jacuzzi Of Despair Is A Deadly Lake Within The Gulf Of Mexico

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The Jacuzzi Of Despair Is A Deadly Lake Within The Gulf Of Mexico

A jacuzzi is the picture of warm, bubbling, soothing relaxation. It's a luxury. But tweak the scene to make those steamy bubbles full of methane and that hot, clear water a thick, briney stew and you have yourself the "jacuzzi of despair." This underwater brine pool in the Gulf of Mexico is no vacation spot—it's a toxic pocket of seawater that will certainly kill anything that swims into it. Hopefully we didn't just ruin jacuzzis for you...

Some People Fear Public Speaking More Than Death Itself

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Some People Fear Public Speaking More Than Death Itself

Whether it's a presentation at work, a speech for your brother's wedding, or the opening night of a big performance, most people have experienced "stage fright" to some degree. This fear is so serious that many people rank public speaking higher than death when surveyed about their greatest fears. How could one possibly fear public speaking more than death itself? Because, at the most basic level, humans are social animals.