Two Women Separately Tried To Kill President Gerald Ford In The Same Month

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Two Women Separately Tried To Kill President Gerald Ford In The Same Month

John Wilkes Booth and Lee Harvey Oswald are names every American kid learns in history class. If you didn't already know, these men assassinated two U.S. presidents—Abraham Lincoln and John F. Kennedy, respectively. The names Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme and Sara Jane Moore are obviously less well known, but perhaps they shouldn't be. These two women, independently, attempted to assassinate a U.S. president, and they were the only women in history to do so. But that's not the weirdest part of the story.

You Can Get Away With Murder In Yellowstone's "Zone of Death"

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You Can Get Away With Murder In Yellowstone's "Zone of Death"

From an early age, we learn the laws of our land. If you commit a crime, you have to accept the consequences. But what if crime without consequence actually existed, and it's buried in a loophole of the U.S. Constitution? Yellowstone National Park primarily spans Wyoming, but it also extends to slivers of Montana and Idaho. In a section of that small sliver in Idaho lies the "Zone of Death." Here, you could potentially get away with murder. Sound sensational? Hear us out...

The FBI Has Almost Every Gun Ever Manufactured

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The FBI Has Almost Every Gun Ever Manufactured

If you've ever watched a crime show, you've probably wondered how law enforcement was able to figure out the exact weapon used in a crime. That's easy: they probably have the same one. The FBI keeps a collection of more than 7,000 firearms spanning 80 years inside the FBI Laboratory in Quantico, Virginia. The gun collection is used to compare firearms and other samples in active investigations with virtually every handgun and rifle known to man. As John Webb, a firearms examiner in the Lab's Firearms/Toolmarks Unit, tells FBI.gov: "Often, an investigator will receive a part of a firearm or a firearm that isn't functional. We can take that and compare it with our reference collection, determine what isn't functioning, and repair it so we can obtain the test fires we need to conduct examinations with bullets and cartridge cases."

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from fbi

Before Pablo Escobar, Griselda Blanco Was The Kingpin Of Cocaine

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Before Pablo Escobar, Griselda Blanco Was The Kingpin Of Cocaine

Pablo Escobar wasn't the only prominent cocaine kingpin of the 1970s and '80s. Griselda Blanco, known as the "Godmother of Cocaine," had a peak net worth of $2 billion from smuggling drugs into the United States, namely into Miami from Colombia. In the early 1970s, Blanco set up a lingerie shop in Colombia to aid in this operation. The underwear she invented had hidden pockets designed for smuggling the drug, and many of her drug mules crossing the border wore them. Although famous and wealthy for her cocaine empire, Blanco gained an equally notable reputation for her violence. Legend has it she committed her first murder when she was just 11 years old. Later in life, she would publicly assassinate people in broad daylight, bayoneting a rival in a Miami airport terminal, as well as implementing the drive-by motorcycle shooting method she is credited with inventing. Her total estimated killings lands upward of 200. Unlike Escobar, Blanco lived long enough to enjoy bits of a quiet retirement in a wealthy Colombian neighborhood after serving her prison sentence. However, she was assassinated in 2012 when two people on motorcycles shot her, the infamous murder method she invented herself. Get 10 interesting facts about Blanco in the video below.

A Nose-Witness Can Identify A Criminal Just Like An Eye-Witness Can

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A Nose-Witness Can Identify A Criminal Just Like An Eye-Witness Can

Do you smell that? The nose knows more than you may realize. According to a 2016 study published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology in June 2016, the nose can help identify a criminal in a police lineup. In fact, a nose-witness to a crime can just as reliably identify the guilty party in a police lineup as an eye-witness can. According to research, humans have the ability to identify people by their unique body odor. The human sense of smell (our olfactory system) is associated with our emotional processing. This system is directly linked to the parts of the brain responsible for emotion and memory, the hippocampus and amygdala. As a result, a witness to a crime would most likely experience a strong emotional response when in the presence of that criminal's scent. Watch the videos below to learn more about witnesses and the olfactory system.