Coffee Was A Food Before It Was A Drink

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Coffee Was A Food Before It Was A Drink

Imagine a world without any coffee to drink. Instead, there was coffee to eat. Wonder how Starbucks's business would be then... Crazy as it sounds, this was the case before it was discovered that coffee beans make for a powerful drink. Until that point, coffee was eaten in the form of an energy bar. We'll stick with the liquid stuff, thanks.

Could Coffee Prevent Cirrhosis Caused By Alcohol?

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Could Coffee Prevent Cirrhosis Caused By Alcohol?

One major downside to alcohol is the damage it can do to your body. But recent studies found one promising way to reduce some of that harm. These studies, which looked at a total of more than 430,000 participants, found that drinking two cups of coffee per day reduced the risk of developing cirrhosis of the liver by 44%. The risk continued to drop after three cups of coffee per day, and even four cups. One study found that the link between coffee and a reduced cirrhosis risk was stronger with filtered coffee than boiled coffee.

Does Drinking Coffee Dehydrate You?

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Does Drinking Coffee Dehydrate You?

People have long been warned that drinking too much coffee will cause dehydration. But research suggests there's little truth to that claim: one 2014 study found that caffeine had no effect on the hydration status of 50 subjects who drank coffee as their primary drink, and drank water in the experiment's second phase. Another study found that coffee did not dehydrate tired athletes who drank it during practice. Though caffeine does have a diuretic effect, it isn't strong enough to cause the body to excrete more liquid than it's taking in. What's more, habitual coffee drinkers will find that this diuretic effect diminishes as their system becomes accustomed to the caffeine.

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Key Facts to Know

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    One typically sized serving of espresso contains less caffeine than a cup of coffee. 0:35

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    Although ingesting caffeine does provide a metabolism boost, it is not a surefire way to lose weight. 2:17

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    Caffeine withdrawal is very real, but caffeine is not considered addictive. 3:22

Caffè Sospeso: Buy A Coffee For A Stranger

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Caffè Sospeso: Buy A Coffee For A Stranger

Caffè sospeso translates to "suspended coffee," and it is a Neapolitan tradition. This simple act of charity involves buying an extra cup of coffee that will consumed by someone that perhaps cannot spare the cash. This act boomed during World War II, and has thus found a revival in modern times due to hard economic times. Though this tradition began in Naples, Italy, different businesses across Europe have picked up the practice as a way of spreading generosity.

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Key Facts to Know

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    A suspended coffee is a coffee paid for in advance as an anonymous act of charity. 0:17

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    Other customers don't know that the recipient of a suspended cup of coffee is receiving a charity cup of coffee. 1:01

What's the Difference Between Light And Dark Roast Coffee?

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What's the Difference Between Light And Dark Roast Coffee?

During the roasting process of coffee beans, the caffeine content barely changes. Whether the bean is of light roast or dark roast does not determine its caffeine content necessarily, seeing as the difference between the two is a mere few seconds in the roaster.

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from Nick Uhas

Key Facts to Know

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    During the roasting process of coffee beans, the caffeine content barely changes. 0:33

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    The roasting temperature would have to exceed 600 degrees Fahrenheit in order to affect caffeine content. 0:43

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    The difference between light and dark roast coffee beans is a mere few seconds. 1:30