You're Always Surrounded By A Microbial Cloud

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You're Always Surrounded By A Microbial Cloud

Your microbial cloud surrounds you at all times. It's a melting pot of bacteria, cells, particles, and other organisms that you exude from your skin and orifices. It also carries bits from other people's microbial clouds, as well as pieces of the environment you're occupying. Researchers who collected samples of various microbial clouds in a climate-controlled room have found that the clouds' makeup differs significantly from person to person. This discovery merits further studies with larger sample sizes, but holds promise for both health and law enforcement fields. Doctors could use microbial cloud research to learn more about germs spread, whereas police hope to identify criminals by matching them to their "microbial signatures."

05:36

from SciFri

Key Facts to Know

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    The climate chamber at the Energy Studies in Buildings Laboratory can help scientists determine how big of an influence a person has on an indoor microbiome. 1:25

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    The most common types of bacteria in your microbial cloud are skin- and oral-associated microbes. 3:38

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    Different people seem to have fairly unique microbial clouds. 4:20

Sneezing Releases A Cloud Of Buoyant Gas (And Snot)

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Sneezing Releases A Cloud Of Buoyant Gas (And Snot)

A 2014 study showed that the cloud of gas released after a sneeze kept mucus droplets airborne for greater distances than were previously estimated. The cloud could even carry small droplets upwards toward a room's ventilation system, leading to the possibility of infection for people elsewhere in the building. Before this research, scientists had also assumed that large mucus droplets traveled farther than smaller ones, given their added momentum. The cloud, however, ensures that this is not the case.

05:04

from SciFri

Key Facts to Know

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    Dr. Lydia Bourouiba used fluid mechanics to analyze the physical process of sneezing. 1:25

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    When you sneeze, a "turbulent multiphase cloud" buoys the mucus droplets that you release. 2:14

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    The multiphase cloud released after a sneeze can carry germs up through a room and into the ventilation system. 3:37

Have You Spotted Any Of These Striking Cloud Formations?

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Have You Spotted Any Of These Striking Cloud Formations?

Unsurprisingly, lenticular clouds have caused a fair amount of false UFO sightings. They have the unnerving ability to stay hovering in place, even when there's wind. Polar stratospheric clouds are some of the highest on Earth, and, true to their name, they form close to the poles. The humongous anvil clouds may look awesome, but they have the potential to be dangerous-they can contribute to supercells, thunderstorms known to produce tornadoes and hail stones the size of tennis balls.

05:47

from TopTenz

Key Facts to Know

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    Cirrus radiatus clouds appear to converge at one point on the horizon, but are in fact parallel to one another. 1:01

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    Morning glory clouds are roll clouds that most often occur in northern Australia. 2:22

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    Polar stratospheric clouds are beautifully colorful, but harmful to the ozone layer. 4:56

Walk Into An Alcoholic Cloud Bar

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Walk Into An Alcoholic Cloud Bar

Alcoholic Architecture is the name of the London bar that offers patrons an alcoholic cloud room, where they can absorb alcohol for up to an hour. The cloud is a mixture of spirits and mixer that is pumped into a room with a humidity level of 140%. Before entering the cloud, guests must wear a plastic cape with a hood to keep their clothes and hair from getting wet and smelling of alcohol.

01:16

from ODN

Key Facts to Know

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    London is the home of the world's first alcoholic cloud bar. 0:00

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    Customers of Alcoholic Architecture don't drink; they absorb alcohol through their lungs and eyeballs from a cloud. 0:09

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    At Alcoholic Architecture, a mixture of spirits and mixer is pumped into a room with a humidity level of 140%. 0:29

The Oort Cloud: Believe It Or Not

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The Oort Cloud: Believe It Or Not

Nobody has ever seen it, but astronomers are convinced the Oort cloud exists. It is imagined similar to a fishbowl with our Solar System floating in the middle.

04:04

Key Facts to Know

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    Astronomers believe there is a zone around the solar system called the Oort cloud, but it has never been observed. 0:24

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    We are sitting 19,200 light years from the center of the Milky Way. 0:43

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    Scientists think the Oort cloud contains up to 2 trillion icy objects. 2:12