Black Licorice Can Be Dangerous

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Black Licorice Can Be Dangerous

A 10-year-old boy in Bologna, Italy was hospitalized after he had multiple seizures. Doctors tested his blood and vital signs and were puzzled over the fact that despite his youth, he had high blood pressure and dangerously high levels of cortisol, the body's primary stress hormone. It wasn't until they asked about his brown teeth that they discovered the problem's root cause: the boy had been eating 20 licorice toffees every day for four months. Black licorice gets its natural sweetness from an acid called glycyrrhizin, which can have the unfortunate side effect of depleting the body's levels of potassium, a chemical that's essential for normal heart activity. Though the example from Italy shows that black licorice can be risky for any age, it's most dangerous for those over 40. According to the FDA, older people who consume a 2-ounce bag of black licorice every day for only two weeks can suffer from abnormal heart rhythms, hypertension, edema, and congestive heart failure. Although cutting the treat out of your diet will usually solve the problem, if you're a regular black licorice consumer and experience any of these symptoms, it's a good idea to call your doctor.

More M&M's Than You'll Probably Ever Eat Are Stamped Every Day

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More M&M's Than You'll Probably Ever Eat Are Stamped Every Day

As you could probably imagine, the number of M&M;'s made in factories every day is pretty massive. But on each, individual little iconic bit of chocolate candy is a famous feature: the white M. But how do they print a single M on every delicate piece of candy? Firstly, they don't-many fall through the cracks and miss getting stamped because they are slightly misshapen. The way the Ms get on the candies is by offset printing. This means that the letter is not printed, but transferred onto the delicate surfaces.

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Key Facts to Know

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    The "M"s are printed onto M&M's by offset printing with a rubber blanket. 1:27

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    The Ms in M&M stands for the names of the co-creators of the candy. 2:35

Who Was The Berlin Candy Bomber Of 1948?

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Who Was The Berlin Candy Bomber Of 1948?

The Berlin Blockade lasted from 1948 to 1949, and was one of the first international crises of the Cold War. During this time, the Soviet Union blocked access to West Germany, but air forces from many countries including the United States, Canada, New Zealand, and South Africa made over 200,000 flights to the region to provide West Berliners with necessities like fuel and food. During this time, an American pilot named Gail "Hal" Halvorsen gave a group of 30 West Berlin children two sticks of gum. The children graciously and respectfully shared between them all. Halvorsen decided to them drop candy from his plane specifically for these grateful and generous kids. To indicate to the kids that the candy plane was coming, Halvorsen (nicknamed the Candy Bomber and Uncle Wiggly Wings) would wiggle the wings of his plane before dropping the candy on tiny parachutes to the children.

The Tootsie Roll Legacy

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The Tootsie Roll Legacy

The founder of the Tootsie Roll company was Leo Hirshfield, an Austrian immigrant who started the business in a small New York City shop in 1896. More than 64 million Tootsie Rolls are made every day, from a recipe that theoretically includes a little bit of the original batch.

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Key Facts to Know

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    More than 60 million Tootsie Rolls are made every day. 0:16

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    The Tootsie Pop was the first soft-centered lollipop. 0:27

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    The Tootsie Rolls company has reduced the thickness of the hard coating on Tootsie Pops over the years. 0:54